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News

In June, a new cultural tourism calendar and website called 7 Days in L.A. was launched, featuring listings for unique tours of the southland available every day of the week. 7 Days in L.A. isn't a tour operator, but a consortium of...
Visit the California State University Channel Islands archives library at the 10th Annual Archives Bazaar. The 1990s saw a small publishing revolution in the form of zines: independently- or self-published magazines that sought to...
Today, shopping malls hang garland, pipe in holiday tunes, and build showy reproductions of St. Nicholas' polar hideout, attracting customers to their privately owned concourses and encouraging the buying spirit. But before malls,...
In 1991, the Los Angeles Public Library and Photo Friends launched the landmark SHADES OF L.A. project where Los Angeles residents were invited to contribute copies of their family photos to the LAPL Photo Collection. The goal was to...
From CicLAvia to a new comprehensive bike plan, Los Angeles has been imagining new ways to get around the city on two wheels. But perhaps nothing today matches the ambition behind a Pasadena millionaire’s turn-of-the-20th-century...
Exposition Park is known today for football games, dinosaur exhibits, and its sunken rose garden. But as its original name—Agricultural Park—suggests, the park's history reveals a time when farming in Los Angeles was not limited to ...
One of the ironies of Los Angeles history is that a city synonymous with freeway and automobile traffic once transported its residents over the largest regional rail transit system in the world. Today, Los Angeles is redefining itself...
Mount Washington: a hill more than a mountain, the landform in northeast Los Angeles is home today to leafy streets and artists' bungalows. But just a century ago, Mount Washington remained carpeted in chaparral, its hilltop land...
Usually, when historic landmarks fall to the wrecking ball, they are lost forever, preserved only in our memory—and in our region's archives. But soon memory will once again take physical form when several historic landmarks from L.A.'...
L.A. as Subject's latest post on the KCET website features photographs and documents related to Charles Fletcher Lummis, the larger-than-life Angeleno who was one of the Southern California's greatest boosters and one of the most...
Why does downtown Los Angeles' grid include a street with such a distinctively New York name? Broadway may be one of L.A.'s oldest streets -- laid out by surveyor Edward O. C. Ord in 1849 -- but until 1890, Angelenos knew it only as...
Last Friday, 41,000 acres of the Angeles National Forest charred by the 2009 Station Firereopened to the public. With summer's return, and with newly accessible trails to explore, Southern Californians will soon flock to the San...
In L.A. Noire, gamers assume the role of an LAPD detective and investigate crime in 1947 Los Angeles. L.A. as Subject's latest post for KCET's SoCal Focus blog looks at how Southern California archives informed the look and content of...
As twilight faded over Pasadena on September 9, 1894, an artificial sun flickered to life for the first time. High above town in the San Gabriel Mountains stood a wonder of the new electric age: a 60-inch General Electric searchlight,...
Today, the Santa Monica (I-10) Freeway is an indelible marker across the Los Angeles landscape, a mini-equator that delineates boundaries between cultural and historical hemispheres of the city. Southern Californians depend on the...