Archives Bazaar

13th-annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar

Saturday, October 20, 2018
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Doheny Memorial Library
USC University Park Campus

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All Day. All in one Place.

Come and celebrate the diversity of stories that make Southern California such a place of discovery. At the Los Angeles Archives Bazaar, presented by L.A. as Subject and the USC Libraries, anyone with an interest in the region’s history will find something of value. A broad array of institutions and archives will have experts on hand to show off their collections and answer questions.

In addition to the wealth of information on display from exhibitors, day-long programming will feature preservation workshops and enlightening presentations.

The USC Libraries serve as the host institution for L.A. as Subject, an alliance of libraries, museums, and other archival and cultural organizations. The relationship complements the USC libraries’ strong regional history collection and is a natural outgrowth of the libraries’ efforts to preserve and expand access to the primary sources of L.A. history.

USC is minutes from downtown Los Angeles and is easily accessible by major freeways and the Metro Expo line. Doheny Library is located in the center of campus, adjacent to Alumni Park and across from Bovard Auditorium, on Trousdale Avenue. For information regarding parking on campus, visit the Parking Services Website.

2018 ARCHIVES BAZAAR PROGRAM

FRIENDS LECTURE HALL (Room 240)

9:15–10:45 a.m.
RESEARCHING L.A. 101
Have you ever wondered how to get started with your research on Los Angeles— or with research in general? This presentation, by LISA CRANE and SARA CHETNEY of the Claremont Colleges, will give you a detailed overview of how and where to start, including basic research tips useful for anyone working with primary and secondary source material. Topics will include researching from home, visiting archives, the ins and outs of reading rooms, and more.

11:00 a.m.–12:10 p.m.
LOST L.A.: ARCHIVING THE CALIFORNIA DREAM
Currently airing Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. on KCET, Season 3 of Lost L.A. explores the untold history behind the fantasy of California. Join a panel of archivists and researchers as they discuss how rare archival artifacts unlock access to hidden dimensions of the Golden State’s past. CSUN history professor JESSICA KIM moderates a panel that includes JESSICA BITTER of the Yosemite National Park
Archives, BARRY HAUN of the Surfing Heritage and Culture Center, JEFF PIRTLE of NBCUniversal, MARC WANAMAKER of the Bison Archives, and retired Joshua Tree National Park ranger JOE ZARKI.

FRIENDS LECTURE HALL (Room 240)

1:00–1:50 p.m.
TEACHING CALIFORNIA
Adopted by the State Board of Education in July 2016, California’s new History-Social Science Framework outlines an instructional approach for K-12 that gives students a better understanding of California’s history, improves literacy, and empowers civic learning and engagement. Teaching California, a new initiative from the California Historical Society and California History-Social Project, will offer free and expansive Framework-aligned instructional materials, including curated primary source material from California’s rich repositories. FRANCES KAPLAN—a Reference Librarian at the California Historical Society and part of the core team working on the Teaching California project—will walk through the origins of the new Framework and Teaching California, and share archival materials from the ongoing content development process. Attendees will learn how selected archival materials from recently processed collections related to the city and county of Los Angeles will form the basis of a new classroom-ready curriculum.

2:00–2:50 p.m.
CURATING CALIFORNIA DIGITALLY FOR AN ENGAGED PUBLIC
A group of leading writers, editors, and curators will discuss their efforts to gather the range of California stories (and the California story) amid changes in communication technologies. Of consideration will be differences in critically curating stories in journalistic, textbook, and peer-review formats, as well as options for collaborative exhibition efforts in digital and traditional arrangements
with an engaged public as the primary audience. Various challenges and opportunities (local, regional, and statewide) will receive attention fromconsidering the stories as such—finding them, writing them, preserving them in print, digitally, online, and institutionally—as well as other practical matters of public engagement, including aesthetics, funding, and access. JASON SEXTON (Boom California; California State University) moderates a panel with GUSTAVO ARELLANO ( LA Times, LA Taco), GIAO LUONG BAKER (USC Digital Library), LYNELL GEORGE (KCET-Artbound, Angel City Press), ANTHEA HARTIG (California Historical Society), and JULIE MAKINEN (The Desert Sun).

3:00–5:00 p.m.
LOST LA: PREVIEW SCREENING OF “BEACH CULTURE” FOLLOWED BY A SEASON 3 BEHIND THE SCENES Q&A
One of Southern California’s great international exports has been its beach culture. Discover the untold history of how surfers, bodybuilders, and acrobats taught Californians how to have fun and stay young at the beach—and how the 1966 documentary The Endless Summer shared the distinctively L.A. idea of the beach with the rest of the world—with this exclusive preview screening of Lost L.A.’s “Beach Culture” episode. Following the screening, go behind the scenes of the making of the Emmy Award-winning public television series Lost L.A.—a coproduction of KCET and the USC Libraries—with host Nathan Masters and the show’s production team. Explore how filmmakers work with archivists and rare, primary sources to tell essential stories of Southern California. Los Angeles-based journalist JULIA WICK, formerly editor-in-chief of LAist and currently editorial director of Time’s Up, moderates a panel that includes executive producer MATTHEW CROTTY, host and executive producer NATHAN MASTERS, associate producer KATIE NOONAN, coproducer STEVEN REICH, and producer/director THOMAS RIGLER.

ACADEMY FOR POLYMATHIC STUDY (Room 241)

9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

SEEING 20/20 IDEA LAB
L.A. as Subject will be celebratng its 25th Anniversary in the year 2020. In preparation for this celebratory event, the SEEING 20/20 IDEA LAB provides a space to reflect on L.A. as Subject's past while looking forward to envision the next twenty-five years of our existence. Visit the LAB to brainstorm, create, and share your reflections on L.A. as Subject and how we should mark our silver anniversary!

 

1:00–1:50 p.m.
ALL THE SAINTS PLUS TEN
In early 2000, local artist-author J. MICHAEL WALKER noticed in his copy of the now-defunct Thomas Guide that Los Angeles—a city named for a saint, Our Lady of the Angels—has dozens of streets bearing the names of saints. Thus began an eight-year project, a sort of poetic road trip, researching all 103 of our city’s saint-streets, to locate where and how they intersect with the tales of saints.
Walker frequently found that these points of convergence spoke to aspects of our multicultural heritage, illuminating our past. His work culminated in a 2008 solo show at the Autry Museum and an award-winning book, All the Saints of the City of the Angels: Seeking the Soul of LA on Its Streets (Heyday, 2008). Now, ten years later, Walker revisits his project to discover that many of its themes—
homelessness, racism, border issues, and violence against women—remain as current as today’s headlines.

2:00–2:50 p.m.
TALES FROM THE AMERICAN HOTEL
From its earliest days as a hotel for Black Americans, to its takeover by bohemian artists in the 1980s, to its rebirth as a boutique hotel in the twenty-first century, the four-story American Hotel on the corner of Hewitt Street and Traction Avenue in downtown Los Angeles has born witness to the city’s ongoing evolution. Tales of the American, a new documentary streaming on Amazon Prime, dives into the building’s history, beginning in 1905. Through interviews, photos, and archival footage, the film weaves a colorful tapestry of events, memories, and characters that have played central roles in the life of the structure. Filmmakers STEPHEN SEEMAYER and PAMELA WILSON present clips of the documentary and discuss the research behind the telling of this uniquely L.A. story.

INTELLECTUAL COMMONS (Room 233)

9:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m.
FROM WAX TO WIRES: THE WACKY AND WONDERFUL WORLD OF A/V PRESERVATION
In this increasingly born-digital world, it is easy to forget a vast amount of data still resides on older formats that are more and more difficult to read as the mechanisms for playing them fall prey to age and obsolescence. DAWN AVELINE, head of preservation at the UCLA Library, will discuss tactics and pitfalls of working with rare audiovisual materials—such as wax cylinders and wire recordings—as well as more common cassette formats. This presentation is sponsored by the Los Angeles Preservation Network (LAPNet).