"A Work of Love and of Protest:" A Panel about Leo Politi and Communities - June 18, 2011

USC Libraries

"A Work of Love and of Protest:" A Panel about Leo Politi and Communities - June 18, 2011

The Studio for Southern California History invites you to join us for a special event:

 

June 18th, 2011 - "A Work of Love and of Protest:" Panel about Leo Politi and Communities at 11AM

 

The Studio for Southern California History (Studio) announces the panel and discussion “Remembering Leo Politi” which will celebrate the work and life of Leo Politi. The panel will focus on how Leo Politi represented different neighborhoods (i.e. Olvera Street, Chinatown, Bunker Hill) in his works, especially his books and paintings. This event is free but reservations are required—contact the Studio at 213-229-8890 to reserve a space.

 

Leo Politi (1908–1996) was an Italian American artist and author who wrote and illustrated over 20 children's books, as well as Bunker Hill, Los Angeles (1964), intended for adults. Politi’s murals are visible throughout Los Angeles—most notably in Chinatown at Castelar Elementary School and at El Pueblo Historic Monument and his “Blessing of the Animals.” Politi’s works often celebrated cultural diversity, and many were published in both English and Spanish.

 

Panelists include:

Mary Yan Joe (“Moy Moy”), the focus of Leo Politi’s beloved children’s book Moy Moy;

Ellen Daigle, artist and Politi family friend;

Fabricio Espasande, LA historian writer, and director;

Ann Stalcup, author of Leo Politi, Artist of the Angels;

Max Benavidez PhD, award-winning author and and senior editor of Lectura Books.

 

Several original works by Leo Politi will be on display at the Studio to complement this panel, as well as to illustrate how Leo Politi was impacted by LA. This event is part of Navigating LA, the Studio’s current exhibit and the culmination of a semester's worth of work for the Cultural Studies gradute course "Welcome to L.A.," which explores the region as a complex and cross-cultural space where community, borders, migration and bodies interact, shift, change and are contested daily and through the region's history.