News

FINAL WEEK: "Becoming Persian" at the Fowler Museum

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content This installation highlights the work of local and award winning photographer Shelley Gazin and is featured in the "Light and Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews" exhibit at the Fowler Museum. "Becoming Persian: Photographs & Text Threads Illuminating the Iranian-Jewish Community" is a photographic study by Gazin…
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KCET Video Series Debuts May 30

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content On Thursday, May 30, a new web video series showcasing L.A. as Subject member collections and the archivists, librarians, and experts who care for them debuts on KCET.org. Through photographs, maps, films, and other resources from L.A. as Subject member collections, Incline L.A. tells the story of incline railways from…
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Arch and Castle Rocks: Lost Landmarks of Pacific Coast Highway

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Surfers. Palatial estates. Soul-crushing traffic. Pacific Coast Highway treats motorists to many iconic Southern California views and experiences. But two distinctively shaped rocks have been missing from the Pacific Palisades shoreline for decades, victims of the scenic highway's development. For as long as Southern…
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Executive Committee nominations now open

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Nominations for the L.A. as Subject (LAAS) Executive Committee members are now being accepted. There are 5 seats that need to be filled for the incoming 2013-2015 Executive Committee term, including the Executive Committee Chairperson. Please send your nominations for Executive Committee members and/or chair directly…
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A Freeway for Bicycles? It Happened in Pasadena

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content From CicLAvia to a new comprehensive bike plan, Los Angeles has been imagining new ways to get around the city on two wheels. But perhaps nothing today matches the ambition behind a Pasadena millionaire’s turn-of-the-20th-century scheme: a bicycle freeway connecting the Crown City to Los Angeles. Southern California was…
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What's Missing From the Earliest-Known Drawing of Los Angeles?

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Without the handwritten caption reading "Part of Los Angeles," it might be difficult to place the above drawing -- generally considered to be the oldest extant drawing of the city. The Los Angeles that William Rich Hutton saw when he first arrived on July 7, 1847, is virtually unrecognizable today. Hutton came to Los…
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Remembering L.A.’s Other Trolleys: The Yellow Cars

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Los Angeles remembers its Red Cars with an almost mythic reverence. Replicas of the Pacific Electric Railway’s red-liveried trolleys now transport tourists through a Disney theme park, while Angelenos swap wistful stories about the streetcar that would take you to the beach, deep into the Inland Empire, or all the way…
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When L.A. Was Empty: Wide-Open SoCal Landscapes

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Early photographs of Los Angeles surprise for many reasons, but often what's most striking is how empty the city looks. Open countryside surrounds familiar landmarks. Busy intersections appear as dusty crossroads. Southern California entered the photographic record at the cusp of a dramatic transformation in the…
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Before Its Time: Burbank’s Experimental Monorail

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Decades before Walt Disney moved his studio there and dreamed up Tomorrowland, Burbank glimpsed another man’s futuristic vision in 1910, when a colorful inventor named Joseph Fawkes built an experimental monorail, the Aerial Swallow. Keep reading the full post at Los Angeles magazine's City Think blog.
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When Knott's Berry Farm Was Actually a Farm

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Orange County was more farmland than suburb—a landscape of orange groves and cow pastures rather than tract houses and fairytale castles—when Walter Knott opened his first roadside produce stand in 1923. The dusty highway passing through Knott’s berry farm was fast becoming the principal route between Los Angeles and…
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8th-annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Los Angeles history comes alive at the 8th-annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar. Organized by L.A. as Subject and presented by the USC Libraries, the annual event celebrates the diversity of Southern California’s history. For scholarly researchers, journalists, history buffs, and those simply interested in exploring the…
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Hooray for...Colegrove? Remembering Hollywood's Forgotten Neighbor

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Glance at an old map of the Hollywood area like the one above and two things stand out. First, the land is remarkably empty. There are few roads and even fewer structures. Second, two separate towns appear where we would expect one: Hollywood, destined for stardom, and Colegrove, destined for obscurity. What happened to…
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Incline L.A.: Catalina's Island Mountain Railway (Episode 3)

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content The year was 1892, and Catalina Island was in foreclosure. Its owner, George Shatto, had envisioned a resort town on the island but had built few tourist amenities apart from the three-story Hotel Metropole. When the island finally slipped from Shatto's hands, its new owners purchased it for just $280,000. Today,…
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Catalina Island’s Lost Landmark, Sugar Loaf Rock

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content In 1929, dynamite forever changed the look of Catalina’s Avalon Bay. Long one of Catalina’s most prominent landmarks, Sugar Loaf Rock was a volcanic monolith rising some 50 feet above the harbor where Avalon’s iconic Casino building stands today. Early 20th-century guidebooks described the Sugar Loaf as Avalon’s…
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