News

Remembering L.A.’s Other Trolleys: The Yellow Cars

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Los Angeles remembers its Red Cars with an almost mythic reverence. Replicas of the Pacific Electric Railway’s red-liveried trolleys now transport tourists through a Disney theme park, while Angelenos swapwistful stories about the streetcar that would take you to the beach, deep into the Inland Empire, or all the way…
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Before Its Time: Burbank’s Experimental Monorail

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Decades before Walt Disney moved his studio there and dreamed up Tomorrowland, Burbank glimpsed another man’s futuristic vision in 1910, when a colorful inventor named Joseph Fawkes built an experimental monorail, the Aerial Swallow. Keep reading the full post at Los Angeles magazine's City Think blog.
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A Freeway for Bicycles? It Happened in Pasadena

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content From CicLAvia to a new comprehensive bike plan, Los Angeles has been imagining new ways to get around the city on two wheels. But perhaps nothing today matches the ambition behind a Pasadena millionaire’s turn-of-the-20th-century scheme: a bicycle freeway connecting the Crown City to Los Angeles. Southern California…
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Arch and Castle Rocks: Lost Landmarks of Pacific Coast Highway

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Surfers. Palatial estates. Soul-crushing traffic. Pacific Coast Highway treats motorists to many iconic Southern California views and experiences. But two distinctively shaped rocks have been missing from the Pacific Palisades shoreline for decades, victims of the scenic highway's development. For as long as Southern…
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Eastside Beer: Tapping Into L.A.'s Forgotten Brewing History

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Palm trees arc across cans of Golden Road’s Point the Way IPA, and a haloed Los Angeles City Hall peeks through the logo of Angel City Brewery. As craft brewers embrace the city’s unique iconography, transform historic downtown buildings into meeting houses, and find other ways to establish a connection with Los…
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What's Missing From the Earliest-Known Drawing of Los Angeles?

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Without the handwritten caption reading "Part of Los Angeles," it might be difficult to place the above drawing -- generally considered to be the oldest extant drawing of the city. The Los Angeles that William Rich Hutton saw when he first arrived on July 7, 1847, is virtually unrecognizable today. Hutton came to Los…
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When the Los Angeles River Ran Wild

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Imagine the Los Angeles River before its metamorphosis into a concrete flood control channel, and Mark Twain’s quip about falling into a California river and coming out “all dusty” might come to mind. But the historical record, including photos like the shown here, paints a much different picture. Keep reading the…
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When Lincoln Park Was Eastlake

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Like many of Los Angeles' first public parks, Eastlake (now Lincoln) Park began as unwanted land: a fifty-acre site rejected by a railroad and given to the city for free. But like its crosstown rival, Westlake (now MacArthur) Park, Eastlake soon grew into one of the city's most popular outdoor retreats.   Located…
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KCET Video Series Debuts May 30

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content On Thursday, May 30, a new web video series showcasing L.A. as Subject member collections and the archivists, librarians, and experts who care for them debuts on KCET.org. Through photographs, maps, films, and other resources from L.A. as Subject member collections, Incline L.A. tells the story of incline railways…
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The Mt. Lowe Railway’s Thrilling, Terrifying Circular Bridge

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Call it 19th-century L.A.’s idea of a thrill ride. Leaving the safety of the granite slopes, trolley cars raced out onto a creaking, cantilevered wooden trestle, soaring over a 1000-foot sheer drop—with no reassuring seat belts or safety bars. Keep reading the full post on Los Angeles Magazine's CityThink blog.
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8th-annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Los Angeles history comes alive at the 8th-annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar. Organized by L.A. as Subject and presented by the USC Libraries, the annual event celebrates the diversity of Southern California’s history. For scholarly researchers, journalists, history buffs, and those simply interested in exploring the…
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L.A. as Subject Honors Wally Shidler

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content L.A. as Subject has honored private collector Wally Shidler with its 2013 Avery Clayton Spirit Award. Wally Shilder has been amassing his “Historical Collection of Southern California Ephemera” since he was a teenager.  He is a third generation Angeleno and his interest in history was piqued by his grandmother who…
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When Knott's Berry Farm Was Actually a Farm

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Orange County was more farmland than suburb—a landscape of orange groves and cow pastures rather than tract houses and fairytale castles—when Walter Knott opened his first roadside produce stand in 1923. The dusty highway passing through Knott’s berry farm was fast becoming the principal route between Los Angeles and…
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Documenting and Preserving L.A.'s Olympic History

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content As Southern Californians tune into the infamously delayed coverage of London's 2012 Olympic games, many will inevitably think back to the Los Angeles games of 1984, and a few may even remember the games' first appearance here in 1932. Though short-lived, Los Angeles' two turns in the Olympic spotlight loom large in…
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Seventh & Broadway: Photos of Downtown's Crossroads through the Decades

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content   Quoting John E. Fisher of the L.A. Department of Transportation, the L.A. City Nerd recentlyshared this interesting fact on Facebook: in 1924, the downtown L.A. intersection of Seventh Street and Broadway was the busiest in the world with 504,000 people crossing those streets each day. The chaotic scenes captured…
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