News

When Anaheim's Flying-Saucer Arena Touched Down Near Disneyland

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Had one of Tomorrowland's flying saucers gone missing? When the Anaheim Convention Center's arena opened in the summer of 1967, it looked as if a spacecraft from another world had touched down directly opposite Katella Avenue from Disneyland. Designed by Los Angeles-based architects Adrian Wilson and Associates, the…
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How N.Y.C.'s Broadway Gave Its Name to an L.A. Street

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Why does downtown Los Angeles' grid include a street with such a distinctively New York name? Broadway may be one of L.A.'s oldest streets -- laid out by surveyor Edward O. C. Ord in 1849 -- but until 1890, Angelenos knew it only as Fort Street. Problems with pronunciation provided the impetus for the name change. By…
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New book by LAAS Executive Commitee member David Boulé!

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Cloaked in mystery and until modern times available only to the elite, the orange has been known as the fruit of the gods, the food of emperors, a token of gratitude, and the symbol of health, wealth, and love. The dream of California since its discovery by Europeans has been that it is a place of plenty, of potential,…
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Little Tokyo celebrates 130th anniversary

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Commemoration of the 130th Anniversary of Little Tokyo, 1884-2014 Throughout 2014, the Little Tokyo Historical Society (LTHS) will observe a year-long celebration of the 130th anniversary of Little Tokyo, which had its origin in 1884 with the establishment of a humble restaurant, Kame, at 340 East First Street. To…
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These Massive Hangars in Orange County Once Housed WWII Airships

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Rising conspicuously above the red-tile roofs and big-box stores of suburban Tustin, California, these two massive hangars stand as monuments to a lost age of aviation, built when lighter-than-air dirigibles held promise as the future of air travel—and air warfare. They rank among the largest wooden structures in the…
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This Giant Searchlight Once Scanned L.A. From the Mountains Above

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content As twilight faded over Pasadena on September 9, 1894, an artificial sun flickered to life for the first time. High above town in the San Gabriel Mountains stood a wonder of the new electric age: a 60-inch General Electric searchlight, by many accounts the largest in the world. This massive projector first dazzled…
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Was Western Avenue Originally L.A.'s Western Boundary?

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content It seems logical enough -- Western Avenue, as the oft-repeated explanation goes, is so named because it once formed Los Angeles' western boundary. But is there any truth to this just-so story? Some streets did once mark L.A.'s western city limit. Most notably, West Boulevard's name dates to 1915, when the city's…
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Event with 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winner for Biography

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Join the Allendale Branch Library as it hosts “An Afternoon with Megan Marshall” on Saturday, May 30, 2015, at 2:00 p.m.  A graduate of Pasadena’s Allendale Elementary and Blair High School (1971), Marshall returns to her hometown for a discussion, reading, and book signing at the Allendale Branch Library, 1130 S.…
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Before 1948, L.A.'s Power Grid Was Incompatible With the Rest of the Nation's

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Before 1948, there was something funny about the Southland's electricity. Plug in a clock from New York and it would lose 10 minutes every hour. Spin a record on a turntable from San Francisco and it would sound deep and drowsy. Some gadgets wouldn't work at all. The problem? Southern California's power grid ran on a…
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Ernie Marquez 2014 Avery Clayton Spirit Award Winner

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content In this land of newcomers and transplants, Ernest Marquez can trace his California lineage back further than most. Born in 1924 on land that the Mexican government granted to his great-grandparents in 1839, Marquez has devoted much of his life to documenting a family history that began in 1771, when his…
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Monomania L.A.: The Obsessive Collectors of Southern California

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content What happens when collecting becomes more than a hobby? File cabinets conquer living rooms. Boxes scrape the ceilings of garages. A trip to a paper ephemera show becomes a grail quest. Even dumpsters offer the promise of a new acquisition. Such collectors perform a tremendous service to scholars and the public by…
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Metro wins an Emmy!

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (“Metro”) won an Emmy in the public programming category for the Metro Motion show on Union Station’s 75th Anniversary.  The 30-minute episode aired just prior to the Union Station anniversary celebration on May 3, 2014:…
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How Los Angeles Erased Entire Hills From Its Urban Core

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content n 1912, Los Angeles considered an audacious plan to reshape its topography. A group calling itself the Bunker Hill Razing and Regrading Association proposed to pump water from the Pacific Ocean, pipe it 20 miles to the city center, and spray the seawater through high-pressure jets against a ridge of hills to the…
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How 19 Giant Earthmovers Carved Dodger Stadium Out of a Mountain

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content They literally moved mountains to create Dodger Stadium. Between 1959 and 1962, an army of construction workers shifted eight-million cubic yards of earth and rock in the hills above downtown Los Angeles, refashioning the rugged terrain once known as the Stone Quarry Hills into a modern baseball palace. Keep reading…
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