News

When Anaheim's Flying-Saucer Arena Touched Down Near Disneyland

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Had one of Tomorrowland's flying saucers gone missing? When the Anaheim Convention Center's arena opened in the summer of 1967, it looked as if a spacecraft from another world had touched down directly opposite Katella Avenue from Disneyland. Designed by Los Angeles-based architects Adrian Wilson and Associates, the…
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New book by LAAS Executive Commitee member David Boulé!

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Cloaked in mystery and until modern times available only to the elite, the orange has been known as the fruit of the gods, the food of emperors, a token of gratitude, and the symbol of health, wealth, and love. The dream of California since its discovery by Europeans has been that it is a place of plenty, of potential,…
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Institute for Baseball Studies now open to the public

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content The Institute for Baseball Studies, the first humanities-based research center of its kind associated with a college or university in the United States, has announced its public hours for the 2015 spring semester at Whittier College.  Effective immediately through May 1, the Institute will be open on Fridays from 12:00…
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How 19 Giant Earthmovers Carved Dodger Stadium Out of a Mountain

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content They literally moved mountains to create Dodger Stadium. Between 1959 and 1962, an army of construction workers shifted eight-million cubic yards of earth and rock in the hills above downtown Los Angeles, refashioning the rugged terrain once known as the Stone Quarry Hills into a modern baseball palace. Keep reading…
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How Los Angeles Erased Entire Hills From Its Urban Core

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content n 1912, Los Angeles considered an audacious plan to reshape its topography. A group calling itself the Bunker Hill Razing and Regrading Association proposed to pump water from the Pacific Ocean, pipe it 20 miles to the city center, and spray the seawater through high-pressure jets against a ridge of hills to the…
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Metro wins an Emmy!

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (“Metro”) won an Emmy in the public programming category for the Metro Motion show on Union Station’s 75th Anniversary.  The 30-minute episode aired just prior to the Union Station anniversary celebration on May 3, 2014:…
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Metro Wins an Emmy

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content It was announced on Saturday, July 26 that the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (“Metro”) won an Emmy in the public programming category for the Metro Motion show on Union Station’s 75th Anniversary. The 30-minute episode aired just prior to the Union Station anniversary celebration on May 3,…
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Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (“Metro”) wins an Emmy!

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content It was announced on Saturday, July 26 that the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (“Metro”) won an Emmy in the public programming category for the Metro Motion show on Union Station’s 75th Anniversary.  The 30-minute episode aired just prior to the Union Station anniversary celebration on May 3,…
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USC Libraries awarded grant for residency program

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content The Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded the USC Libraries and the L.A. as Subject research alliance a grant to develop a residency program that will support archival education. The grant is part of the IMLS Laura Bush 21st-Century Librarian program, which funds training of early career…
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When Oxnard Beach Became 'Hollywood-by-the-Sea'

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Never mind that Tinseltown was five or even fifty miles away. By the mid-1920s, the Hollywood brand was so strong that communities across Southern California were affixing it to their names. Toluca became North Hollywood. Sherman became West Hollywood. And in distant Ventura County, Oxnard Beach became…
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Before 1948, L.A.'s Power Grid Was Incompatible With the Rest of the Nation's

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Before 1948, there was something funny about the Southland's electricity. Plug in a clock from New York and it would lose 10 minutes every hour. Spin a record on a turntable from San Francisco and it would sound deep and drowsy. Some gadgets wouldn't work at all. The problem? Southern California's power grid ran on a…
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Little Tokyo celebrates 130th anniversary

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content Commemoration of the 130th Anniversary of Little Tokyo, 1884-2014 Throughout 2014, the Little Tokyo Historical Society (LTHS) will observe a year-long celebration of the 130th anniversary of Little Tokyo, which had its origin in 1884 with the establishment of a humble restaurant, Kame, at 340 East First Street. To…
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Monomania L.A.: The Obsessive Collectors of Southern California

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content What happens when collecting becomes more than a hobby? File cabinets conquer living rooms. Boxes scrape the ceilings of garages. A trip to a paper ephemera show becomes a grail quest. Even dumpsters offer the promise of a new acquisition. Such collectors perform a tremendous service to scholars and the public by…
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This Giant Searchlight Once Scanned L.A. From the Mountains Above

Sat, 06/04/2016
Content As twilight faded over Pasadena on September 9, 1894, an artificial sun flickered to life for the first time. High above town in the San Gabriel Mountains stood a wonder of the new electric age: a 60-inch General Electric searchlight, by many accounts the largest in the world. This massive projector first dazzled…
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