1981-Present

Yosemite National Park Archive

Several Los Angeles engineering and architectural firms were involved in the design of buildings, bridges, and other iconic features of Yosemite National Park. From 1923-1927, the National Park Service Landscape Division was located in the offices of the Underwood Building on Spring Street in LA. Architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood and Landscape Engineer Daniel P. Hull collaborated on several national park projects including the construction of Yosemite's Ahwahnee Lodge. Los Angeles resident and architect Charles T. Gutleben developed designs for cables on Half Dome, and his company also was involved in other Yosemite projects including the construction of the Rangers Club, the Yosemite Museum, Le Conte Memorial Lodge, and many of the bridges in Yosemite Valley. The Yosemite Archives contains correspondence, plans, and drawings referring to many of these projects.

Go For Broke National Education Center

The Go For Broke National Education Center holds more than 1,150 life history interviews of Americans of Japanese ancestry who served in the United States Army in WWII. Many of the veterans interviewed were born and raised in Los Angeles and the surrounding area. Their videotaped interviews provide us with stories about the neighborhoods in which they lived and worked, the larger Japanese American Community in and around Los Angeles, both the Japanese and American cultures that shaped and molded their identity, values their parents taught them, a unique minority viewpoint of a pre-war and post-war Los Angeles, their experiences as soldiers in the U.S. Army in WWII and much more. Often the veterans contributed photographs and documents to complement their stories. The Go For Broke National Education Center would like to offer access to researchers, adding to the rich history of our city, our state and our country. Incorporated in 1989, Japanese American World War II veterans established the 100th/442nd/MIS WWII Memorial Foundation, now the Go For Broke National Education Center, to build the Go For Broke Monument. The Monument, the first of its kind on the mainland U.S., includes more than 16,000 names of Japanese American soldiers and officers who served overseas during World War II. It was unveiled in June 1999 and is located in downtown Los Angeles at Temple and Alameda streets. The Go For Broke National Education Center today focuses on providing a place and means by which all people can share their stories and recognize how the legacy of their lives contributes to the history of Los Angeles and the American ideals of freedom and equal opportunity for all. Go For Broke offers several programs to educate the public on this important time in history, including: A Tradition of Honor Teacher Training Program, Hanashi Oral History Program, Resource Center, Go For Broke Monument and other media projects. Go For Broke National Education Center is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization.

University of California, Irvine Libraries Special Collections and Archives

Special Collections and Archives houses the UC Irvine Libraries' collections of rare books, manuscripts, archives, photographs, and other rare and special materials. Major collections include the Critical Theory Archive, the Southeast Asian Archive, and the University Archives, as well as in-depth collections on Orange County and California history, dance and performing arts, 20th-century political pamphlets, artists' books, rare books, and small press books. UCI’s collection documents the history of Orange County from the mission period through the present, in 3,000 books and pamphlets and more than 100 historical and contemporary archival and manuscript collections. Strengths include the Irvine Ranch, City of Irvine, Irvine Company, San Juan Capistrano Mission, city histories, ranchos, the 19th-century actress Helena Modjeska, environmental issues, politics, Disneyland, LGBT issues, and surfing. Materials include photographs, family papers, letters, oral history interviews, maps, postcards, newspapers, government documents, and an enormous collection of local ephemera (such as flyers and brochures).

Writers Guild Foundation, Shavelson-Webb Library and Archives

As the only collecting institution focused solely on the art, craft, and history of Hollywood writers and their labor union, the Writers Guild Foundation Library & Archive are vividlly relevant to the creative and business communities of Los Angeles. The holdings document a rich facet of Los Angeles culture in relation to the role of writers in the entertainment industry. The collections include Writers Guild of America historical materials, current and vintage produced and unproduced scripts, letters, periodicals, photographs, production materials, memorabilia, oral histories, and personal items pertaining to film, television, radio and new media writers. The non-profit Writers Guild Foundation strives to promote and preserve the work of writers for the screen, and to inspire and educate writers everywhere. In addition to the Shavelson-Webb Library & Archive, other esteemed programs include High School Workshops, the Military Veterans Writing Project, and a Visiting Writers program.

Sierra Madre Historical Archives

The Sierra Madre Historical Archives collects, preserves, and provides access to a variety of materials that tell the Sierra Madre story: photographs, slides, postcards, scrapbooks, city directories, maps, letters, periodicals, posters, works of art, sound recordings, moving images, and ephemera. The archives collection includes the Sierra Madre Oral History Project in which residents describe Sierra Madre social life and customs. The collection's subject area strengths include San Gabriel Mountain resorts accessible via local trails and Sierra Madre art and artists. The local history collection is built on a partnership. It is jointly owned and maintained by the Sierra Madre Historical Preservation Society and the Sierra Madre Public Library.

Los Angeles Harbor Department Historical Archives

The Collections within The Los Angeles Harbor Department Historical Archives document the development of The Los Angeles Harbor as well as the surrounding communities of San Pedro, Wilmington and Long Beach beginning in the late nineteenth century through today. The Archive maintains over 26,000 linear feet of materials including photographs, plans, drawings, books and assorted ephemera that have been generated during the course of official business and community outreach.

Little Tokyo Historical Society

Little Tokyo Historical Society commemorates the Japanese American history and heritage related to Little Tokyo in Los Angeles through archival collections, photos, videos, gallery exhibits, lectures, and workshops. "Los Angeles's Little Tokyo (Arcadia Publishing, November 2011). "Little Tokyo: The 1930's Golden Years", 2013 calendar now on sale at www.littletokyohs.org.

Los Angeles Public Library, Rare Books Room / Digitization & Special Collections Department

Our core rare book collections include California history, Mexicana, bullfighting, Pacific voyages, food and wine, costume, travel in North America, Europe and the Near East, history of the book and printing, ornithology and Native American culture and history. 
Our special collections include the Casey Fashion Plate Collection, the Tom Owen Collection of Bookplate Art, Japanese woodblock prints, California prints, artists' books, travel posters, the Menu Collection, the Paul Fritzche Collection of Culinary Literature, the Cookery Ephemera Collection, fruit crate labels, the Gladys English Collection of American Children's Book Illustration, the Behymer Opera Collection, the Charles F. Lummis Autograph Collection (over 700 signatures, poems, notes and original art from 19th to early 20th century notable figures), George A. and Florence A. Dobinson Letters (mainly correspondences), Beaudry Candy Company Archive (company records in ledgers, notes and handwritten recipes), personal photographs of Walter Henry Rothwell (first director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic), minutes, correspondences and notes of the Southwest Society and the Southwest Museum, L.A. Mayor Sam Yorty scrap books, Orra Eugene Monnette papers and the Los Angeles Resistance Collection (documents the non-cooperation with the Vietnam War draft).

 

Friends of Greystone

FOG's Archive mission is to collect, preserve and exhibit material that documents the history of Greystone Mansion. Materials in our collection consists of a rich and expanding historic photo archive of the property, family and The Knoll (the subsequent home of Lucy Doheny Battson). The archive collection also includes family portraits, magazine articles, maps, books, ephemera and personal family materials and objects. Greystone has been on the National register of Historic places since 1976. The land on which Greystone was built, was a gift from oil baron Edward L. Doheny Sr., the first man to discover oil in Los Angeles, to his son, Edward "Ned" Doheny. The mansion is most notable for its famous family, architect Gordon Kaufmann and its association to the USC Doheny Library as well as the Doheny Mansion at Mount St. Mary's College in Los Angeles. The Friends of Greystone is a non-profit organization founded to preserve, protect, promote and enhance the historic Greystone Mansion.

National Archives at Riverside

We are a unit of the National Archives and Records Administration. Our holdings consist of the historically significant materials created by Federal agencies in southern California, Arizona and the greater Las Vegas, Nevada area. Agencies represented include the U.S. District Courts, the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service. Our records document the complicated relationship between the Federal government and the people of southern California, including the role of the Navy and the Immigration and Naturalization Service in the evacuation of Japanese and Japanese-Americans during World War II; the struggle for civil rights such as the desegregation of California schools in the landmark case, Mendez v. Westminster. Our District Court records contain cases of sedition, prohibition violations, obscenity and the struggle for free speech. Our holdings of the Bureau of Indian Affairs not only record the culture and history of southern California's Mission Indians, but also the work of the Los Angeles Employment Assistance Office, which worked between 1947 and the 1970s to relocate Native Peoples from rural reservations to learn trades in the Los Angeles area. We have records that document the growth of Hollywood as an industry and the lives of the people who worked there including the naturalizations of many Golden Age actors such as Cary Grant, Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland and others. The records of the U.S. District Court also document the development of technology and intellectual property rights in the film industry. The settlement and growth of southern California is documented here. Our holdings document the management of public lands, including homesteading, ranching and mining. We have records created by the Federal government related to the growth of aerospace industry giants such as Lockheed, Douglas Aircraft and Hughes Aircraft. Included is information on the research and development of aircraft such as the H-4 flying boat (the Spruce Goose) and the Bell XS-1. Also represented are records related to labor relations during World War II. The records of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers document their work on flood control in the Los Angeles river system, including the iconic channelization of the LA River.