1900-1920

Getty Research Institute, Research Library

Located on the Getty Center campus in Brentwood, the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute focuses on the history of art, architecture, and archaeology from prehistory to the contemporary period. Presently, the collections are strongest in the history of western European art and culture in Europe and North America; however, in recent years, they have expanded to include other areas, such as Latin America, Eastern Europe, and selected regions of Asia. The library's foundation lies in its special collections of original documents and objects. Recent acquisitions and initiatives have documented developments during the postwar years in Southern California. The special collections include contemporary artists' photographers' by Los Angeles artists; archives and manuscripts of Southern California artists, writers, and curators such as Sam Francis, Robert Irwin, and Henry Hopkins; archives of art publications such as High Performance magazine; prints, drawings, and multiples, including a complete set of those produced by Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions; rare photographs and photographers’ archives, such as Charles Brittin's; architectural drawings and comprehensive archives such as John Parkinson's drawings for Union Station, the Walt Disney Concert Hall documentation, the Pierre Koenig and John Lautner archives, and the Julius Shulman Photography Archive highlighting Los Angeles architecture. Documenting the advanced art that put Los Angeles and Southern California on the map of the international art world, Long Beach Museum of Art Video Archive, now part of the Research Library's collections, contains close to 5000 tapes and supporting files.

Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum

The Homestead Museum collection includes a diverse array of items from Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Region covering the general period of 1830 to 1930 and includes ephemera, maps, photographs, printed works, and three-dimensional everyday artifacts.

The Salvation Army Museum of the West

The Salvation Army Museum of the West houses materials of the Western Territory of the Salvation Army. The Southern California Division is headquartered in Los Angeles proper but services all of Southern California, including Salvation Army churches, Adult Rehabilitation Centers, shelters, and other programs run by The Salvation Army. The collection chronicles the developments and changes of The Salvation Army from its first arrival in Los Angeles in 1887 to present day.

Pasadena Museum of History

The Research Library and Archives has been collecting material relating to the history of Pasadena since 1924. The archives contains approximately 1 million historic images (including photos, negatives, postcards, stereographs) of Pasadena and surrounding areas. There are 45 cubic feet of maps and plans of the area, as well as a set of Sanborm fire insurance maps for Pasadena. There is a large collection of ephemera, scrapbooks and photo albums relating to the history of the city. There are more than 150 special collections, including the Sylvanus Marston set of architectural drawings; the Tournament of Roses Collection; the Giddings-Hollingsworth Family Collection; the Fenyes-Curtin-Paloheimo Papers; the Black History Collection; the Hugh Anderson/Model Grocery Company Collection. There are approximately 1,000 books and 50 linear feet of periodicals on the history of the city and general Southern California area, including a nearly complete run of Pasadena city directories from 1895-1976.

Los Angeles Unified School District, Art and Artifact Collection/Archives

The Los Angeles Unified School District’s (LAUSD) art and artifact collection has been amassed since the opening of the first district school in 1855. The collection began to be organized in 2001 when LAUSD received a grant to hire a part time collections curator and manager. The mission of the archives is to (1) engage and educate the Los Angeles Community, including students, families, faculty, staff, and alumni, as well as independent historians, curators, librarians, archivists, and interested parties, about the history of the LAUSD and its role within the greater community (2) preserve and protect the cultural heritage of the LAUSD (3) encourage the school community to become involved in the dynamic process of contributing to the Collection in ways that reflect current environments and cultures. Objects and artworks are located at both schools and administrative sites. Major collections include: Photographs and negatives depicting people, places and events at district schools taken by the Audio Visual Section, Public Information Office and other district branches from the 1930s through 1980s Paintings, drawings and murals donated by graduating classes Rare book collections of California History, Carnegie Art History Collection and Dawson Collection (formerly located at George Washington High School) and the former LAUSD Kindergarten Memorial and Professional Libraries Contents of Venice High School’s museum of antiquities called the Latin Museum Works Progress Administration paintings, murals and sculpture Misc. curriculum materials from the 1890s to 1970s Various District administrative records such as Board Minutes, Annual Reports, Budgets and files on the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Historic schoolhouse furniture, teaching devices and office equipment

Southern California Genealogical Society

The SCGS Library holds nearly 40,000 volumes, with a relatively small portion of the material related to LA. We have published indices to cemetery records, vital (birth, death and marriage) records, and immigration and naturalization. We provide free access to some data on our website. The Society is in the midst of a project to recreate the 1890 Census for Los Angeles County. The census records were lost in a fire in Washington DC, and our project is an attempt to recreate this valuable historical and genealogical resource. The 1890 data base will include vital records (births, deaths, marriage); cemetery records; city directories for the communities in the county; immigration and naturalization records; military records; voting records (Great Register); educational records; educational, social and fraternal societies; personal family records; and the flagship data, an every-name index of the Los Angeles Times from January 1, 1890 through December 31 of that year. New sources, as they are uncovered, will be added to this rich resource.

Water Resource Center Archives, University of California

The Water Resources Center Archives (WRCA) is a unique library that collects archival materials on all aspects of water resources in California and the West. WRCA manages over 125 collections with several significant collections that pertain to water development in southern California. These collections include Franks Adams, Harry F. Blaney, John D. Galloway, Walter L. Huber, Oman J. Lillevang, Charles Lee, J.B. Lippincott, Thomas H. Means, Andrae B. Norskog, and James D. Schuyler.

African American Resource Center, LA County Library

The Black Resource Center (BRC) was founded in 1978 as a special service of the County of Los Angeles Public Library to meet the informational, cultural, and educational needs of African Americans in Los Angeles County, by supporting research and study on social, historical and cultural aspects unique to the African Americans experience. The Center serves as an information and referral agency to other libraries, government agencies and the general public. It is an important link in the survival and preservation of the heritage of African Americans. The collection consists of books, periodicals, pamphlets, microform, videos/DVDs, audio-recordings, posters, and 16mm films. Preservation is a major concern of the Center. The collection includes microfilm of Black newspapers from 1899, and issues of the Los Angeles Sentinel from its inception in 1934 to the present. A core collection of books by and about black music and musicians was initiated in 1982, and is continuously maintained as new books become available. The Center provides reference assistance, subject bibliographies, and referral information regarding community resources and public agencies. The Center also presents programs with local authors and entertainers. The Center participates in local community activities such as job fairs, career days, and health fairs. The materials collection and other activities of the Resource Center are supported by funds from the County of Los Angeles Public Library and donations from private donors.

Asian Pacific Resource Center, LA County Library

The Asian Pacific Resource Center was established in 1979, to meet the information needs of a sudden influx of new immigrants from East and Southeast Asia. The center includes resources in English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese and Vietnamese. The emphasis of English language materials is on the Asian Pacific Islander American experience with a core collection on the culture, art, and history of China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, Vietnam and smaller holdings on Hawaii and American Samoa. The microfilm collection holds over 100 titles of historical Asian American / immigrant newspapers including documents and newspapers from the Japanese American Internment. Programs and book discussions at the center celebrate and explore the rich history and cultural heritage of Asian and Pacific Islander Americans. The Asian Pacific Resource Center provides reference service to researchers and to the general public. The center offers information and referral services to assist in locating agencies that address the needs of the Asian and Pacific Islander community. The Asian Pacific Resource Center strives to promote a deeper understanding and appreciation of the diverse cultures that form Los Angeles County.