1848-1899

Los Angeles Public Library, Photograph Collections

The Los Angeles Public Library’s Photograph Collections comprise a number of major collections including: The Security Pacific National Bank Collection, donated to LAPL in 1981, consisting of over 150,000 photographs documenting the growth of Los Angeles and its many neighborhoods. The SPNB Collection also contains images from the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce depicting business, industry, sports and agriculture in Los Angeles during its greatest growth spurt, 1920-1939. The Shades of L.A. archive contains images representing the full range of contemporary and historic ethnic and cultural diversity in the greater Los Angeles region. Copied from family albums in a project sponsored by Photo Friends, the photographs show daily life, work, social organizations, personal and holiday celebrations, and migration and immigration activities. Also archived are approximately twelve oral histories that were collected during the project and available through the LAPL website. http://www.lapl.org/catalog/shades/ The Los Angeles Herald-Examiner Photograph Collection consists of the newspaper’s morgue of 2.2 million photographs doumenting Southern California, the nation, and the world in the years from the 1920s to 1989. The Valley Times newspaper morgue spans from 1946-1972 and focuses on the post-war growth of the San Fernando Valley. The LAPL Photo Collection also has smaller collections of specific photographers including Ansel Adams, Herman Schultheis, Howard Kelly, Gary Leonard, Carol Westwood, C.C. Pierce, William Reagh, and Ralph Morris.

California State University, Northridge, Delmar T. Oviatt Library, Map Collection

The Oviatt Library Map Collection contains approximately 400,000 cartographic resources, including historical and government maps, historical aerial photographs, large-format atlases, GIS data, historical gazetteers, and a reference collection. Our reading room contains a scholarly collection of atlases and books emphasizing geography, cartography, GIS, and San Fernando Valley history. Government document holdings include a comprehensive collection of maps from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Army Map Service (AMS), the National Park Service (NPS), as well as nautical and aeronautical charts.

Archdiocese of Los Angeles Archival Center

The Archival Center that the Archdiocese of Los Angeles built at the San Fernando Mission and opened in 1980 is a measured response to the church's obligation to collect and preserve records associated with the human activities constituting California's Catholic heritage. The facility houses papers, documents, correspondence, and related materials generated since 1840 by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and its antecedent jurisdictions. The Center's archives include numerous photographic collections and various image holdings that number in the hundreds of thousands. The center's library presently comprises about fifteen thousand books primarily on California history, American Catholic history, bibliography, archives, and archivism. Eleven digests of the center's archival documents have been published, and more than ten thousand of the library's books are classified and described in The Literary High Spots of Mission Hills, California (1998). Various objects from the center's holdings are on exhibit in the center's Historical Museum. It is the "hope and prayer" of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles "that the books, documents, manuscripts, and historical memorabilia housed at the Archival Center will become the means for as-yet-unborn generations to stand taller upon the shoulders of their predecessors."

Azusa Pacific University, Special Collections

The institution has Special Collections including: 1) Local history; 2) American religious history; and 3) history of the American west. Under Local History, the Azusa-Foothill Citrus Collection consists of manuscripts, legal and business papers, financial journals and ledgers, photographs and maps dating back to 1844. The Sayre MacNeil Collection contains family papers and correspondences, and the Roger Dalton Collection also contains personal papers. The Oral History Collection is comprised of 17 personal histories of East San Gabriel residents who witnessed the early growth and subsequent decline of Southern California’s citrus industry. Under American religious history, institution has Monsignor Francis J. Weber Collection on American Catholic Church History which consists of books and other printed materials by Msgr. Weber who served as Archivist to the Archdiocese of Los Angeles in 1962. Under History of the American West, the George Fullerton Collection of Western Americana and California has significant collections on the early exploration of the American West, books of the California Gold Rush, county and city histories, and biographies.

Los Angeles Police Museum

This collection is limited to material from, and relative to, the history of the Los Angeles Police Department. The collection consists of retired and replica police vehicles, a retired helicopter and police motorcycles. Uniforms, equipment and artifacts dating to the beginning of the LAPD are also held within the collection. The non-public archive houses annual reports, photos and motion picture film. The majority of the holdings consist of material donated from private persons and sources and should not to be confused with the official holdings of the LAPD and the City of Los Angeles.

Downey Historical Society

The Downey Historical Society is located at the Downey History Center in Apollo Park. For more than thirty years, the society's all-volunteer staff has been gathering and preserving records and artifacts from and about the southeastern part of Los Angeles County. The society's collection includes original photographs from 1870 to the present (copy negatives, duplicate prints, or 35-mm slides are available for various images of historic and current events), postcards, artifacts of Downey's past, and local realia. The books, pamphlets, and periodicals in the library focus on Downey, Los Angeles County, and California. Among the subjects addressed are Native Americans, missions, archaeology, architecture, photography, biography, ethnology, and necrology. The holdings on Governor John Gateley Downey and on the aerospace industry are particularly strong. There are also directories for Los Angeles County dating back to 1871 and, on microfilm, the federal censuses of Los Angeles County from 1850 to 1920 and Sanborn Fire Insurance maps for the Los Angeles region. In the society's archive are a broken run of Downey newspapers from 1888 to 1917 and a complete run from 1918 to 1969. Also available are Downey school account books; insurance registers; pioneer water company records; burial and cemetery records from Downey Cemetery; Los Angeles County court dockets for the townships of Los Nietos, Downey, and Norwalk from 1873 to 1957; and Los Angeles County District Attorney's registers of arrests from 1883 to 1919.

University of California, Los Angeles, Film and Television Archive

UCLA Film & Television Archive holds over 250,000 films and television programs produced from the 1890s to the present. The collection includes independent and studio-produced shorts and feature films, advertising and industrial films, documentaries, local and network TV programming, commercials, news and public affairs broadcasts, and 27 million feet of newsreels produced between 1919 and 1971. • Containing material dating back to the 1890s, the motion picture holdings include: Mayme A. Clayton Library & Museum African American Film Collection, significant collections related to African-American and Chicano/a contributions to film and television, animation, films from major studios including Columbia, Paramount, Warner Brothers and Twentieth-Century Fox, Hearst Metrotone Newsreels, Pre-Code era and film noir titles, industrials, sponsored films, amateur films and home movies, Soundies, independent films from the Sundance collection, and over 10,000 LGBT holdings in the Outfest collection. • The television collection documents the entire course of broadcast history. Significant collections include: DuMont TV, primetime and Los Angeles area Emmy Award nominees and winners, KTLA newsfilm, ABC-TV Collection of over 20,000 titles, early television dating back to the late 1940s, over 10,000 commercials, 50 years of Hallmark Hall of Fame broadcasts, and a significant collection of “Golden Age” anthology dramas. • The News and Public Affairs Collection (NAPA) consists of over 100,000 news programs and broadcasts taped off air from 1979 to 2003. Programs held in the NAPA collection include: local Los Angeles news, network and cable nightly and morning news programs, and local foreign language news. The collection also holds extended coverage of important news events, such as 9/11

University of California, Los Angeles, Asian American Studies Center

The Reading Room/Library of the Asian American Studies Center houses a significant archive on Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. The holdings include books, documents, printed ephemera, photographs, films, paintings, and videos that chronicle the development of Asian American communities in Los Angeles and nationwide. In collaboration with Special Collections at the university’s Young Research Library, the Asian American Studies Center has established collections that preserve and provide access to hard-to-find materials donated by members of the Asian Pacific community in Southern California. The Japanese American Research Project is the largest of these collections. It contains more than one hundred groups of personal papers, several thousand responses to surveys conducted in the 1960s, approximately four hundred audiotaped oral histories, artwork created by internees during World War II, and other rare records and publications related to Japanese Americans.

UCLA Library Special Collections

Library Special Collections is the largest of the special collections units administered by the university and encompasses the following divisions: Rare Books; Manuscripts, Prints, Photographs, and Maps; Oral History; and University Archives. It acquires, organizes, preserves, and provides access to rare and unique materials in the humanities and social sciences. The holdings include three hundred thousand rare books, forty-two thousand linear feet of manuscript and archival collections, and four million photographic negatives and prints. In addition, the department’s nineteenth- and twentieth-century collections contain a variety of artifacts, audio recordings, videos, printed ephemera, oral history transcripts, phonograph records, postcards, and posters. The department acquires principally materials relating to the arts; California; area studies; ethnic studies; the history of printing, including atlases and early Italian books; and literature, including children’s books. Some of the department’s areas of specialization are Hebraica and Judaica; the history of philosophy; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies; natural resources; photography; travel and exploration; and women. The more than twenty-four hundred collections in the Department of Special Collections are managed by the divisions of. Each division’s holdings are selected or created to complement those of the other divisions. Researchers are welcome to discuss holdings at greater length with the staff.

UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts at the Hammer Museum

The collection of the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts comprises more than 45,000 prints, drawings, photographs, and artists' books dating from the Renaissance to the present. Established in 1956 with a substantial gift from Fred Grunwald, the collection has been steadily enriched through significant acquisitions and donations. A primary resource for teaching and research, the Grunwald Center houses one of the most significant collections of works on paper in the country. The Grunwald Center is home to several important Los Angeles-based collections. These include the archives of Sister Corita Kent (1918–1986), the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, and Edition Jacob Samuel. Designer of the “LOVE” postage stamp first issued by the United States Postal Service in 1985, Sister Corita Kent was art director at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles until 1968. Her colorful screen prints address social and political issues through the visual language of Pop Art and experimental typography. The Grunwald Center’s collection features several thousand examples of her work, including rare preparatory studies. The Tamarind Lithography Workshop was founded in 1960 by printmaker and painter June Wayne, a leader in the movement to revive the art of lithography in Los Angeles. Through partnerships between master printers and important contemporary artists, the workshop produced an eclectic group of limited edition lithographs. The Grunwald maintains a complete record of the first 20 years of Tamarind’s activities, offering a rich cross section of contemporary printmaking in Los Angeles and internationally. Co-owned with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Jacob Samuel Archive documents the activities of master printer Jacob Samuel, who has been working out of his Ocean Park studio since 1988. Samuel, who has collaborated with artists ranging from Marina Abramovic to Christopher Wool, reinvents classic intaglio techniques to create stunning examples of contemporary printmaking. The Grunwald has been enriched by its long-standing association with the UCLA Department of Art. It houses an extensive selection of works by UCLA art department faculty from the past five decades, including Clinton Adams, William Brice, John Paul Jones, Catherine Opie, and James Welling. The Grunwald also maintains an important collection of works by Los Angeles photographers trained under Robert Heinecken, who established the Grunwald’s photography collection as a teaching resource for the photography program he built at UCLA.