1848-1899

University of California, Los Angeles, Film and Television Archive

UCLA Film & Television Archive holds over 250,000 films and television programs produced from the 1890s to the present. The collection includes independent and studio-produced shorts and feature films, advertising and industrial films, documentaries, local and network TV programming, commercials, news and public affairs broadcasts, and 27 million feet of newsreels produced between 1919 and 1971. • Containing material dating back to the 1890s, the motion picture holdings include: Mayme A. Clayton Library & Museum African American Film Collection, significant collections related to African-American and Chicano/a contributions to film and television, animation, films from major studios including Columbia, Paramount, Warner Brothers and Twentieth-Century Fox, Hearst Metrotone Newsreels, Pre-Code era and film noir titles, industrials, sponsored films, amateur films and home movies, Soundies, independent films from the Sundance collection, and over 10,000 LGBT holdings in the Outfest collection. • The television collection documents the entire course of broadcast history. Significant collections include: DuMont TV, primetime and Los Angeles area Emmy Award nominees and winners, KTLA newsfilm, ABC-TV Collection of over 20,000 titles, early television dating back to the late 1940s, over 10,000 commercials, 50 years of Hallmark Hall of Fame broadcasts, and a significant collection of “Golden Age” anthology dramas. • The News and Public Affairs Collection (NAPA) consists of over 100,000 news programs and broadcasts taped off air from 1979 to 2003. Programs held in the NAPA collection include: local Los Angeles news, network and cable nightly and morning news programs, and local foreign language news. The collection also holds extended coverage of important news events, such as 9/11

University of California, Los Angeles, Asian American Studies Center

The Reading Room/Library of the Asian American Studies Center houses a significant archive on Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. The holdings include books, documents, printed ephemera, photographs, films, paintings, and videos that chronicle the development of Asian American communities in Los Angeles and nationwide. In collaboration with Special Collections at the university’s Young Research Library, the Asian American Studies Center has established collections that preserve and provide access to hard-to-find materials donated by members of the Asian Pacific community in Southern California. The Japanese American Research Project is the largest of these collections. It contains more than one hundred groups of personal papers, several thousand responses to surveys conducted in the 1960s, approximately four hundred audiotaped oral histories, artwork created by internees during World War II, and other rare records and publications related to Japanese Americans.

UCLA Library Special Collections

Library Special Collections is the largest of the special collections units administered by the university and encompasses the following divisions: Rare Books; Manuscripts, Prints, Photographs, and Maps; Oral History; and University Archives. It acquires, organizes, preserves, and provides access to rare and unique materials in the humanities and social sciences. The holdings include three hundred thousand rare books, forty-two thousand linear feet of manuscript and archival collections, and four million photographic negatives and prints. In addition, the department’s nineteenth- and twentieth-century collections contain a variety of artifacts, audio recordings, videos, printed ephemera, oral history transcripts, phonograph records, postcards, and posters. The department acquires principally materials relating to the arts; California; area studies; ethnic studies; the history of printing, including atlases and early Italian books; and literature, including children’s books. Some of the department’s areas of specialization are Hebraica and Judaica; the history of philosophy; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies; natural resources; photography; travel and exploration; and women. The more than twenty-four hundred collections in the Department of Special Collections are managed by the divisions of. Each division’s holdings are selected or created to complement those of the other divisions. Researchers are welcome to discuss holdings at greater length with the staff.

UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts at the Hammer Museum

The collection of the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts comprises more than 45,000 prints, drawings, photographs, and artists' books dating from the Renaissance to the present. Established in 1956 with a substantial gift from Fred Grunwald, the collection has been steadily enriched through significant acquisitions and donations. A primary resource for teaching and research, the Grunwald Center houses one of the most significant collections of works on paper in the country. The Grunwald Center is home to several important Los Angeles-based collections. These include the archives of Sister Corita Kent (1918–1986), the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, and Edition Jacob Samuel. Designer of the “LOVE” postage stamp first issued by the United States Postal Service in 1985, Sister Corita Kent was art director at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles until 1968. Her colorful screen prints address social and political issues through the visual language of Pop Art and experimental typography. The Grunwald Center’s collection features several thousand examples of her work, including rare preparatory studies. The Tamarind Lithography Workshop was founded in 1960 by printmaker and painter June Wayne, a leader in the movement to revive the art of lithography in Los Angeles. Through partnerships between master printers and important contemporary artists, the workshop produced an eclectic group of limited edition lithographs. The Grunwald maintains a complete record of the first 20 years of Tamarind’s activities, offering a rich cross section of contemporary printmaking in Los Angeles and internationally. Co-owned with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Jacob Samuel Archive documents the activities of master printer Jacob Samuel, who has been working out of his Ocean Park studio since 1988. Samuel, who has collaborated with artists ranging from Marina Abramovic to Christopher Wool, reinvents classic intaglio techniques to create stunning examples of contemporary printmaking. The Grunwald has been enriched by its long-standing association with the UCLA Department of Art. It houses an extensive selection of works by UCLA art department faculty from the past five decades, including Clinton Adams, William Brice, John Paul Jones, Catherine Opie, and James Welling. The Grunwald also maintains an important collection of works by Los Angeles photographers trained under Robert Heinecken, who established the Grunwald’s photography collection as a teaching resource for the photography program he built at UCLA.

Special Collections Department, Occidental College Library

Collection Description: For over one hundred years, many notable gifts and endowments have been bestowed upon Occidental College Library for the advancement of the College mission in higher education and as an institution for the preservation of cultural heritage. With nearly 100,000 rare books, archival papers and manuscripts, visual media, paintings, prints and artifacts of unique significance in the arts, literature, theatre, book arts, and local, regional and cultural history, Special Collections supports undergraduate, scholarly and public research. Collections providing information about Los Angeles and the Southern California region include the following: • Japanese American Relocation Collection: letters, pamphlets, newspapers, and other publications related to the forced internment of people of Japanese heritage during World War II with particularly emphasis on college student relocation and higher education • Robinson Jeffers Collection: books, manuscripts, photographs, letters, editions, and other works by and about this Californian poet (1887-1962); Ward Ritchie Press Collection: examples of the work of this Los Angeles printer and book designer (1905-1996), along with Ritchie’s Christmas book collection • K. Garth Huston Plantin Press Collection: nearly all the books printed by Saul and Lillian Marks at their Plantin Press in Los Angeles between 1930 and the mid-1980s • Guymon Mystery and Detective Fiction Collection: first editions, manuscripts, film scripts, photographs, and other material in and about these genres from 1592 to 1975 • Pauley-Voorhis Western Americana Collection: first-person narratives by the men and women who explored and settled the American West • Max and Virginia Hayward Californiana Collection: first-person narratives and histories dealing with the early settlement of California • Northrop/Millar Aviation Collection: material documenting the history and development of the aviation industry in Southern California • Bill Henry Collection: personal library and papers of! the Los Angeles Times columnist (1890–1970), whose interests included the Olympic Games, modern history, presidential campaigns, and aviation in Southern California • Klamm Collection: nine thousand stereoscopic views includes images of people and places in Southern California • Upton Sinclair Collection: Collected works of writer and social activist Upton Sinclair (1878-1968), magazines, pamphlets, news clippings and materials related to End Poverty in California, EPIC, the 1934 campaign for California governorship • The College Archives: administrative records and college publications documenting college life and higher education since 1887, includes thirty-five thousand historical photographs of the college, college activities and northeastern Los Angeles • Other smaller collections include the papers of author Edna Anderson, Osgood Hardy and Charles Fletcher Lummis including Mr. Lummis' handwritten "Daily Journal" are also among the department's holdings.

South Pasadena Public Library, South Pasadena Historical Archives

The City of South Pasadena Historical Archives contain primarily material pertaining to the history of the South Pasadena area, with some of the material dating to before the city’s incorporation. Included are files on city buildings listed in the National Registry of Historical Landmarks, biographies of prominent government officials, city telephone directories dating back to 1885, and an extensive collection of photographs. The business, residential, and city documents in the archives range from chamber of commerce publications to records related to the history of the city’s school system.

Pomona Public Library, Special Collections

Special Collections at the Pomona Public Library maintains extensive pamphlet files of clippings, photographs, brochures, and other ephemera related principally to Pomona Valley and especially to the City of Pomona. Also preserved in Special Collections are papers from businesses, organizations, churches, schools, families, and individuals from the City of Pomona and nearby areas; records of the Los Angeles County Fair; a scrapbook that contains newsletters from the World War II Japanese internment/relocation camp in Pomona; wine labels from wineries across the United States; and books on California history in general and Southern California and Pomona Valley in particular. Special Collections also encompasses a number of discrete collections. Among these are the Frasher Photo Collection, which consists of images of the American Southwest during the early twentieth century; the Citrus Industries Collection, which has unique manuscripts and printed records relating to approximately twenty-eight California citrus companies, along with more than four thousand different citrus crate labels; the Water Industries Collection, which includes manuscript records from seventeen private water companies of the Pomona Valley; the Padua Hills Theater Collection, which contains the bulk of the company’s archives; and the Postcard Collection, which comprises approximately thirty thousand picture postcards from all over the world.

Philosophical Research Society

Founded in 1934, the Philosophical Research Society is a nonsectarian center for the study and teaching of the world’s wisdom traditions. The Philosophical Research Society Library’s holdings provide a range of information about various countries and philosophies. The holdings include books, many of which are rare or out of print, on subjects such as Sir Francis Bacon, the Orient (India, Near East, Far East, Tibet, China, and Japan), Egypt, North and South American Indians, mythology, biography, psychic phenomena, alchemy, metaphysics, lost continents, divination, art and architecture, medicine, psychology, astrology, theosophy, literature, history, Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, and Masonry.

Pacific Palisades Historical Society

The collections of the Pacific Palisades Historical Society deal with the history of Rancho Boca de Santa Monica; the Chautauqua movement; the Methodist community from 1921 to 1943; the Uplifters Club from 1921 to 1945; the Westside community of German émigrés from 1934 to 1943; Will Rogers; J. Paul Getty and the Parker Ranch; the film industry; beach culture; the now-nonexistent Bernheimer Gardens; and architecture, especially the Case Study houses and the buildings in the Craftsman and the International architectural styles in the area. The society's holdings on the Chautauqua center that existed in Pacific Palisades from 1922 to 1936 are extensive and particularly interesting because the center's activities reveal the concerns at the heart of intellectual, social, and religious life in the Los Angeles region during those years.

Los Angeles Public Library, Photograph Collections

The Los Angeles Public Library’s Photograph Collections comprise a number of major collections including: The Security Pacific National Bank Collection, donated to LAPL in 1981, consisting of over 150,000 photographs documenting the growth of Los Angeles and its many neighborhoods. The SPNB Collection also contains images from the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce depicting business, industry, sports and agriculture in Los Angeles during its greatest growth spurt, 1920-1939. The Shades of L.A. archive contains images representing the full range of contemporary and historic ethnic and cultural diversity in the greater Los Angeles region. Copied from family albums in a project sponsored by Photo Friends, the photographs show daily life, work, social organizations, personal and holiday celebrations, and migration and immigration activities. Also archived are approximately twelve oral histories that were collected during the project and available through the LAPL website. http://www.lapl.org/catalog/shades/ The Los Angeles Herald-Examiner Photograph Collection consists of the newspaper’s morgue of 2.2 million photographs doumenting Southern California, the nation, and the world in the years from the 1920s to 1989. The Valley Times newspaper morgue spans from 1946-1972 and focuses on the post-war growth of the San Fernando Valley. The LAPL Photo Collection also has smaller collections of specific photographers including Ansel Adams, Herman Schultheis, Howard Kelly, Gary Leonard, Carol Westwood, C.C. Pierce, William Reagh, and Ralph Morris.