Migrant Workers

Chapman University, Leatherby Libraries

The Frank Mt. Pleasant Library of Special Collections & Archives Library is the principle repository for the preservation and access of the Leatherby Libraries’ rare and unique collections. Special Collections holds rare books, manuscripts, maps and collections of enduring value while the Archives preserves the history of the university and the Chapman family. The department includes the Dan and Sarah Caton Hogan Seminar Room with appropriate presentation technology, the Aquin Mitsuo Yamagishi Reading Room, and the Huell Howser Reading Room. The Library was named by the late Trustee C. Stanley Chapman, Jr., and his wife, Joan Mt. Pleasant Chapman in honor of Joan’s uncle, Frank Mt. Pleasant, a Tuscarora Indian. We also hold material on the early years of Chapman University when it was located in Los Angeles: 1920-1923 CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF CHRISTIANITY Located at the Wilshire Christian Church in Los Angeles from 1920-1921. Moved to 766 N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, in 1921 1923-1934 CALIFORNIA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE Vermont Ave. campus 1934-1954 CHAPMAN COLLEGE Vermont Ave. campus from 1934-1942 Located on Whittier College Campus from 1942-1945 Vermont Ave. campus from 1945-1954

Californiana, LA County Library

This reference collection is about the history and culture of California. Contains over 20,000 books, magazines, newspaper, and pamphlets. The collection is a non-circulating resource collection of materials about Southern California in particular with a heavy emphasis on Los Angeles County, including individual cities and unincorporated areas. Fiction by major California writers is included as well as historical fiction about California.

Center for Oral and Public History/California State University, Fullerton

Collections include 5,000+ oral histories in 250 projects, representing geographical, ethnic, political, religious, and social communities of selected Orange County, Los Angeles, Southern California, and Western US locales. Topics include community histories, environmental studies, including Sierra Club, Laguna Beach Greenbelt, Bolsa Chica, ethnic studies (African American, Native American, Mexican American, Japanese American, Judaica Studies, Vietnamese Americans), politics and government (Orange County politics, conservative women), society and culture (sulf culture, surf music, women with silicone breast implants, sports and society in Cold War Southern California, theater, baseball, women in long-term marriages, transformation of grocery stores, and new wave in Czechoslovakian film, 1990s UCI fertility clinic scandal, Mormon colonies in Mexico), just to name a few.

University of California, Los Angeles, Chicano Studies Research Center Library and Archive

Established in 1969, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center (CSRC) Library and Archive was the first library of its kind and is now the only freestanding Chicano studies library in the United States. It provides information resources, reference services, and bibliographic instruction for those seeking information on the Chicano experience. The library makes its holdings accessible to users from UCLA and from around the world. Although the CSRC was originally founded to ensure preservation and accessibility of the Chicano experience, it is now becoming the repository of choice for Latino donors in general. The collection includes over 16,000 monographs, approximately 300 serial titles, a large collection of theses and dissertations, over 40,000 digital objects - many of them accessible on the UCLA Digital Library, and a large collection of posters, a/v materials, and a growing collection of archival holdings totalling close to 2,000 linear feet of material. Please note that we are a non-circulating library. Most items may be scanned or photocopied onsite. If you wish to access one of our special collections, please contact us before you visit to make appropriate arrangements.

Asian Pacific Resource Center, LA County Library

The Asian Pacific Resource Center was established in 1979, to meet the information needs of a sudden influx of new immigrants from East and Southeast Asia. The center includes resources in English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese and Vietnamese. The emphasis of English language materials is on the Asian Pacific Islander American experience with a core collection on the culture, art, and history of China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, Vietnam and smaller holdings on Hawaii and American Samoa. The microfilm collection holds over 100 titles of historical Asian American / immigrant newspapers including documents and newspapers from the Japanese American Internment. Programs and book discussions at the center celebrate and explore the rich history and cultural heritage of Asian and Pacific Islander Americans. The Asian Pacific Resource Center provides reference service to researchers and to the general public. The center offers information and referral services to assist in locating agencies that address the needs of the Asian and Pacific Islander community. The Asian Pacific Resource Center strives to promote a deeper understanding and appreciation of the diverse cultures that form Los Angeles County.

USC California Social Welfare Archives

The California Social Welfare Archives (CSWA) was organized in 1979 to collect materials that portray the development of social welfare in Southern California. Our goal is to ensure that pertinent knowledge, information and documents of historical significance are acquired, preserved, and made accessible for contemporary researchers and policy makers and for future generations. The CSWA also conducts an active Oral History Program consisting of focused interviews with lay and professional social welfare leaders in southern California. This program especially seeks to identify persons from the early years. Approximately 100 oral history tapes or disks are in the collections. Donated funds support the transcription and editing of these tapes. The organization conducts its activities under the umbrella of the University of Southern California School of Social Work, which provides some support services. It functions in collaboration with the Doheny Memorial Library's Archival Research Center (ARC), and CSWA collection is used in the ARC's Specialized Libraries and Archival Collections' reading room in the Doheny Library. Major collections include: Family Service of Los Angeles / Family Welfare Association of Los Angeles records from 1930 - 1937; The Los Angeles County Community Relations Conference / Community Relations Conference of Southern California records from 1947 - 1991; the Los Angeles Roundtable for Children records 1982; All nations Church and Foundation records and papers 1925 - 1965; Board of Social work Examiners records 1949 - 1955; California Association for Health and Welfare papers 1933 - 1969; Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils records 1930 - 1948; Gladys H. Culp papers 1945 - 1968; El Nido Services papers 1933 - 1986; Jessie E. Dean papers 1916 - 1943; Los Angeles Area federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers, Inc records 1961 - 1975; Rev. Dr. R.A. McKibben papers 1938 - 55; Metropolitan recreation and Youth Services Council papers 1944 - 72; Economic and Youth Opportunities Agency of Greater Los Angeles records 1963 - 1970; Neighborhood Adult Participation Project, Inc. records 1962 - 1978; California Association of School Social Workers papers 1927 - 1974; Board of Behavioral Science examiners records 1976 - 1982; Competence Certification Board records 1979 - 1982; Los Angeles Council of Social Agencies records 1926 - 1944; Special Service for Groups records 1948 - 1977; Anietta Tidball papers 1950 - 1956; Welfare Council of Metropolitan Los Angeles records 1945 -1954; Welfare Federation of the Los Angeles Area records 1925 - 1962; Southern California Building Funds records 1961 - 1992; Rancho Los Amigos records 1900 - 1990; Midnight Mission 1916 - ; and Carmen Combs papers 1923 - 1979.

University of Southern California, Boeckmann Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies

The Boeckmann Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies was founded in 1985 with a donation of an 80,000 volume book collection related mainly to the study of Spain, Portugal and Latin America. However, this first donation also included books and pamphlets related to Alta and Baja California, the U.S. Hispanic Southwest, the U.S.-Mexico border region, and a small collection of early 20th century books and pamphlets published in Spanish in Los Angeles. Since the mid-1990s the Boeckmann Center has consistently documented the presence of Hispanics in Southern California. This initiative included the creation of the Cuban California Archive (est. in 1997) which focuses on contributions of Cuban Americans and Cuban exiles to Los Angeles and Southern California. Highlights include materials donated by Cuban American composer Aurelio de la Vega, newsletters from the community group the Patronato Jose Marti, items from the Lorente Family including the archive of Carlos Sebastian Lorente's B.L Engineering firm, photographs and playbills of the Havanafama theater group, copies of the Directorio Cubano de Los Angeles and books by and about Cuban American writers in Southern California. The Hispanic Community Archive (est. in 2004) includes the personal and scholarly papers of Luis Andres Murillo and his collection of bilingual ephemera and pamphlets, published in Los Angeles, exemplifying contemporary Spanish language usage in the area. Other donations include a collection related to the Escuela Argentina de Los Angeles, from Dr. Samuel Marks, a donation by Los Angeles teacher and music historian Raymond Valencia Lopez of printed works created for early bilingual education instruction, in the Los Angeles school district. Another collection contains materials relating to the Chicano Movement, Cesar Chavez and journalist Ruben Salazar. Among the Spanish language community newspapers in the collection, published and/or distributed in Los Angeles are complete runs, on microfilm or in hardcopy, of La Voz Libre, 20 de Mayo, Bohemio News, De Norte a Sur, and Tango Reporter. The Chicano Studies Serial Collection on microfilm contains numerous serial titles published in Los Angeles and Southern California. The Boeckmann Reference collection provides information on Mexican Americans, Chicanos/Latinos and other Hispanics in Los Angeles, in addition to reference works related to Spain, Portugal and all countries of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Cal Poly Pomona, Special Collections and Archives

Subject strengths: local history, wine, cookbooks, poetry, botany, mycology, philosophy, art and architecture. Collections: University Archives, Cal Poly Rose Float Collection, Wine Industry Collection, The Thomas Pinney Collection of wine books and wine related research files, the United Farm Workers Collection, Virginia Hamilton Adair Collection, First Edition Collection, John Gill Modern Poetry Collection, Abraham Kaplan Collection, League of Women Voters (East San Gabriel Valley) Collection, Academic Senate Archive, Low magazine archive (student underground newspaper), Cal Poly Women's Club, Student Wives Club, Voorhis School for Boys, Voorhis Family, Robert Lawrence Balzer Collection, World Menu Collection, Kennedy Collection, Humphrey Mycology Collection. Campus History: Cal Poly Pomona was originally founded in San Dimas in 1938, as an all male agricultural/horticultural southern branch campus of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. In 1949 the college acquired the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch in Pomona where it moved the campus in 1956. In 1961 it went coed and in 1966 separated from San Luis Obispo. In 1972, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona was awarded full university status. The University Archives, which document this history includes: photographs, books, records, memorabilia, architectural drawings, sound and video recordings, newspaper clippings and scrapbooks. The University Archives also include materials from the Voorhis School for Boys--the San Dimas institution for orphaned and underprivileged boys that originally inhabited the site of what later became the San Dimas/Voorhis campus of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Charles Voorhis built the school and his son H. Jerry Voorhis was headmaster. The school operated from 1928 to 1938, when Jerry Voorhis was elected to Congress. In 1938 Charles Voorhis donated the school facility to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo to be its Southern California branch. This permitted students to gain experience with cultivation of important "sub-tropical" crops such as oranges. Materials include photographs, film, video, DVDs, books, files, memorabilia, and architectural drawings. The Wine Industry Collection documents all aspects of the wine industry in Southern California, beginning with the Missions. This collection includes books, journals, newspapers, photographs, oral histories, posters, files, winery memorabilia, video recordings, news clippings, wine labels, wine bottles, medals, and wine club newsletters.

Historical Society of the Crescenta Valley

Documents and photos relating to the history of the Crescenta Valley. The La Crescenta Valley Historical Society has a lot of materials on the New Years Flood of 1934, and the town of Montrose, plus some materials on the American portrait artist S. Seymour Thomas.

Tom & Ethel Bradley Center, Oviatt Library, CSU Northridge

The Tom & Ethel Bradley Center (formerly known as the Institute for Arts & Media) archives contain over one million images from Los Angeles based freelance and independent photographers between the 1930s to the present. Approximately 80% of the collection is comprised of African American photographers in and near Los Angeles. The Bradley Center is the only repository for photographs before 1993 from the Los Angeles Sentinel. Oral histories, manuscripts, and other ephemeral materials support the photographic collection. Additionally, the archives contain over six dozen oral histories from African American photographers, Civil Rights leaders and organizers, individuals involved with the history of Los Angeles, Journalism, Mexicans in Exile, and the United Farmworkers. Audio and video comprise the collection along with the personal papers of many individuals and organizations. The manuscript collections contains the papers of many Los Angeles civic leaders, the AFL-CIO, AFT, CA Federation of Teachers, Community Relations Committee of the Jewish-Federation Council of L.A., CPPA, League of Women Voters of L.A., and the United Way of L.A. Other collections include the archives of Journalist Michael Emery and the United Farmworkers Organization. The archives represent one of the largest collections of African American photographers west of the Mississippi and the most extensive collection in Southern California. Represented in the African American collection is the Civil Rights Movement and its leaders as well as local churches, politicians, musicians (many from the jazz era), singers, entertainers, athletes and social organizations. Coverage includes Dr. King, Tom Bradley, Sam Yorty, Rev. H.H. Brookins, Thurgood Marshall, Malcolm X, Earl Warren, Louis Armstrong, Dwight Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, Muhammad Ali, Errol Garner, Dinah Washington, James Baldwin, and many other luminaries. There is documentation of political campaigns, voter registrations and thousands of images of daily life and public occasions such as marches and protests, celebrations and parades. Photographers include Harry Adams, Charles Williams, Guy Crowder, Jack Davis, James Jeffrey, Roland Charles, Maxie Floyd, Calvin Hicks, Black Photographers of California, Bob Douglas, and Gordon “Specs” Powell. Outside of Los Angeles is coverage of the wars in El Salvador and Honduras, the Afro-Columbian community Palenque de San Basilio near Cartagena, Cuba, the Masai and the Maya refugee camps in Mexico. There is extensive documentation of the United Farmworkers organization and César Chávez, Dolores Huerta, Gibert Padilla, Luis Valdez and other leaders of the union and its members. The Bradley Center's Border Studies Collection contains oral histories, video, and photographs documenting border issues and economic violence in Mexico. Also included in the archives are images of the San Fernando Valley including high school and college events. Additionally, IAM houses the Plaza Methodist Church (Los Angeles United Methodist Museum of Social Justice) archives of the beginnings of the church, documenting early Los Angeles and the immigrant communities between the 1890s to the 1960s. Photographers include Richard Cross, Emmon Clarke, Herb Carleton, and Julián Cardona. For additional information please visit the website http://www.csun.edu/bradley-center