Education

Ebell of Los Angeles

Yearbooks, newsletters and bulletins, scrapbooks describing club activities and philanthropic activities spanning the years from 1894 through the present. Furnishings, artworks including paintings and sculpture, clocks, textiles and costumes.

California State University, Long Beach, University Art Museum

The University Art Museum maintains both a permanent collection of twentieth-century works of art on paper and a collection of site-specific outdoor sculpture. The sculpture collection began in 1965 with an International Sculpture Symposium and continues to expand, making the Long Beach campus of only three large public sculpture sites in Southern California. The museum has archival material related to the International Sculpture Symposium and artist files related to the museum’s collections and exhibitions.

California African American Museum

The California African American Museum collects, preserves, interprets, and displays materials that honor the contributions of African Americans to world history and culture. The museum’s art collection focuses on works created by African American artists from the 1800s to the present. It also includes traditional African art and contemporary art by those of the African Diaspora. The museum’s historical collection consists of documents, photographs, artifacts, and other material culture of African Americans, with an emphasis on documenting the experiences of African Americans in California and the American West from the late 1900s to the present. In the museum’s archival collection are books, periodicals, research materials, audio recordings, videos, vintage films, and other artifacts relating to African Americans. Materials specific to Los Angeles are found in the Miriam Matthews Photographic Collection, which contains images depicting African American subjects in Los Angeles from the 1880s to the 1970s collected by California’s first African American librarian; the Vassie D. Wright Collection, which consists of African American literary and historical works donated by the founder and the members of the local Our Authors Study Club; the Walter Burrell Collection, which comprises audio recordings of Burrell’s interviews with African American celebrities, which were broadcast by a local radio station in the early 1970s; and the oral histories collected from Celes King, a member of the family that owned the Dunbar Hotel, local civil rights activist, and former Tuskegee airman, and from John Outterbridge, a visual artist who has been based in Los Angeles since the 1960s and is renowned for his assemblages and for his mentoring of younger artists.

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument is the oldest section of Los Angeles. Its twenty-seven historic buildings clustered around an old plaza range in architectural style from an adobe dwelling of 1818 to a Spanish-style church of 1926. Four of the buildings have been restored as museums. A brochure describing the buildings is available at the Information Desk in the Plaza or at the El Pueblo Visitors’ Center in the Sepulveda House. El Pueblo’s docent organization, Las Angelitas del Pueblo, provides free tours to groups (Tuesday–Saturday, 10 am–1 pm; call 213-628-1274). El Pueblo’s archaeological collection consists of artifacts uncovered during excavations in the El Pueblo area since 1972. Dating from the indigenous or Native American period (before 1781), the Spanish colonial era (1781–1821), the Mexican era (1821–1848), and the first century of the American era (1850s–1940s), these artifacts include numerous “trash pit” shards such as animal bones, household goods, tools, bottles, and ceramics. El Pueblo also holds a range of archival materials relating to the site and its history.

Paley Center for Media

The Museum of Television & Radio, with locations in New York and Los Angeles, is a non-profit organization founded by William S. Paley to collect and preserve television and radio programs and advertisements and to make them available to the public. Since opening in 1976, the museum has organized exhibitions, screening and listening series, seminars, and education classes to showcase its collection of over 100,000 television and radio programs and advertisements. In 2001, the museum initiated a process to acquire Internet programming for the collection. Programs in the museum's permanent collection are selected for their artistic, cultural, and historic significance.

Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic Park

The Museum exhibits American Indian cultural materials, primarily focused on cultures of the Southwestern, Great Basin and Californian culture regions, which were connected by a major trade route from circa 4,000 BP. One of the largest collections is from the California coast and Channel Islands. Seven thousand artifacts are represented, ranging in age from 8-9,000 BP to ethnographic/historic times.

California State University, Northridge, Delmar T. Oviatt Library, Special Collections and Archives

Special Collections and Archives in the Oviatt Library is the home of CSUN's rare book and periodical collections, as well as its archival and manuscript collections. Archival and manuscript collections can consist of many different kinds of materials, including correspondence, diaries, maps, university records, organizational records, photographs, and audio or video recordings. The department is comprised of several areas within the Oviatt Library which were independently established between 1973 and 1996. Special Collections was established in 1973 to house the Library’s manuscripts, rare books, periodicals, maps, prints, and art. Special Collections holds over 35,000 cataloged items and 150 manuscript and archival collections which support the University's curriculum, as well as the research interests of faculty and students on campus. In addition to supporting curricular needs at California State University, Northridge, collecting is focused on several topical areas including American literature, California and the West, children's literature, the history of printing and publishing, human sexuality, music, 19th and 20th century Europe, radio and television scripts, religion, theater and motion pictures, and United States history. The Urban Archives was established in 1979 through the efforts of university faculty, concerned community organizations, and civic leaders. Its purpose is to collect historically significant records of voluntary associations, local political figures, prominent citizens, and civic leaders which have contributed to the growth of Los Angeles County, and influenced government and public thinking since the beginning of the late nineteenth century. The collections document urban development in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, education, journalism in Southern California, labor and guild history, minority and ethnic studies, politicians and political movements, social service and women in Los Angeles. The University Archives is the repository for the historical papers of California State University, Northridge's administration, Faculty Senate, schools and departments, and student activities on campus. The International Guitar Research Archives (IGRA) was founded in 1980, and now holds one of the world’s largest collections of guitar sheet music, especially works for solo guitar, ensemble pieces for multiple guitars, and ensemble pieces for guitar and other instruments. IGRA also holds accompanying resources documenting the lives and careers of numerous guitarists and professional associations, as well as other guitar-related materials. The Old China Hands Archives was established in 1996 to preserve and publicize the heritage of the many people from other countries and cultures who have resided and worked in China. The Archives holds a growing collection of materials generously donated by former Old China Hands, including correspondence, diaries, photographs, postcards, books, periodicals, newspapers, and other materials.

Los Angeles Police Museum

This collection is limited to material from, and relative to, the history of the Los Angeles Police Department. The collection consists of retired and replica police vehicles, a retired helicopter and police motorcycles. Uniforms, equipment and artifacts dating to the beginning of the LAPD are also held within the collection. The non-public archive houses annual reports, photos and motion picture film. The majority of the holdings consist of material donated from private persons and sources and should not to be confused with the official holdings of the LAPD and the City of Los Angeles.

Hayden Memorial Library @ Citrus College

The Hayden Memorial Library at Citrus College archive collection contains photographs, yearbooks (1899-1965), scrapbooks, newspaper clippings, school newspapers, books, ephemera and information that document the history of Citrus College, and depicting people, buildings and events of the City of Azusa and the surrounding San Gabriel Valley. The collection covers the years 1890s to the present. Media includes videotaped interviews with alumni, administrators, and professors concerning the history of Citrus College, which was founded in 1915 by Dr. Floyd S. Hayden and is the oldest community college in Los Angeles County. The archives also contain Citrus College catalogs and schedules, and documents from Citrus Union High School for the period 1899 to 1957.

University of California, Los Angeles, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library

The William Andrews Clark Memorial Library is a rare books and manuscripts collection, with particular strengths in English literature and history (1641–1800), Oscar Wilde, and fine printing. Though the majority of the Clark's collections are focused on Great Britain, the library still maintains significant Los Angeles-related collections. In particular, the library's collections in the fields of fine printing and graphic arts contain personal archives, published works and original art by Los Angeles-area fine printers and artists such as Ward Ritchie, Paul Landacre, Saul and Lillian Marks (Plantin Press), Patrick Reagh, Vance Gerry (Weatherbird Press), and Grant Dahlstrom. The Clark's own institutional archive contains materials on the library's founder, William Andrews Clark, Jr. (a patron of the arts in Los Angeles and a founder of the Los Angeles Philharmonic), the library's growth as a part of UCLA from 1934 to the present, and various plans, drawings and other materials related to the library's 1924-1926 design and construction by architect Robert D. Farquhar.