Education

Side Street Projects

Side Street Projects is a community-based, nonprofit arts organization dedicated to helping artists produce and exhibit their work. Located in the Eighteenth Street Arts Complex in Santa Monica, Side Street Projects pro--vides and maintains a fully equipped workshop where local artists can have their pieces fabricated at reasonable rates or do the work themselves. Also available are a gallery for displaying artists' projects and installations and a workroom that can be rented for artists' workshops, lectures, or rehearsals. Side Street Projects is a place where artists really work, and it is alone in providing affordable support services to the local arts community. The organization's collections include catalogs, announcements, newsletters, and slides documenting all exhibits and projects. Side Street Projects also archives past exhibitions of local artists and maintains a Web site featuring local artists.

Educational Communications

Established in 1958, Educational Communications is dedicated to improving the quality of life on this planet by creating greater awareness of environmental issues. Educational Communications currently holds 600 ECONEWS shows, an Emmy-nominated weekly television series airing on cable and PBS stations and the internet (Youtube); 2200 Environmental Directions radio shows, original audio recordings of the Environmental Directions international radio series, a half-hour interview show that airs on public, commercial, and listener-sponsored, in the United States and worldwide on the internet; two hundred original audio recordings of the Environmental Viewpoints radio series, a magazine-style program that provides news and information, including a calendar of events, music, interviews, and special conference coverage; and sixty original audio recordings of the one-hour shows in the Planet Health radio series. It has 45 years of The Compendium Newsletter (six issues per year; 270 editions). In addition to archival materials for Project Ecotourism, Educational Communications holds papers, letters, photographs, and other materials documenting over fifty years of ecoactivism by the Ecology Center of Southern California and sixty years for Educational Communications including the Oscar-nomination plaque for a documentary. Among the organization's Southern California memorabilia are records, correspondence, photographs, newsletters, and brochures related to the Ecology Center's first Earth Day, which occurred in 1970. The collection also covers the activities of environmental activists in the area. The Environmental Resources Library has over 2000 autographed books about the environment. Other projects include Humanity and the Planet which donates educational supplies and books to groups around the world, and Earth Cultures which presents ethnic folk dance performances and has a collection of dance videos and music. The facility in Idyllwild, California, is now on the National Registry of Historic Places and is available for photo shoots, retreats, meetings, and public visits.

McGroarty Art Center Friends

Longtime Verdugo Hills resident John Steven McGroarty was a playwright, columnist, lawyer, congressman, and poet of California. He lived for many years at Rancho Chupa Rosa, a small hacienda near Tujunga that the City of Los Angeles bought in 1953 and now uses to host culture and craft classes. At the turn of the twentieth century, McGroarty crusaded for the restoration of California's early landmarks, especially the missions that once distinguished the state's landscape. In 1911, with the publication of The Mission Play, a drama about Father Junipero Serra and the rise and fall of the California missions, McGroarty became a popular playwright. The play opened in San Gabriel on 29 April 1912. In addition to other plays, including La Golondrina, Osceola, and Babylon, McGroarty wrote poems, novels, historical works, and the Los Angeles Times column "From the Green Verdugo Hills. "The McGroarty Art Center's collection contains the library and memorabilia of John Steven McGroarty, and the center's archival holdings include plays, books, and Los Angeles Times articles written by McGroarty.

Duarte Historical Museum

The collection of the Duarte Historical Society and Friends of the Library focuses on the history of the City of Duarte and adjacent Bradbury. Its archive includes photographs, records, and other artifacts related to the settlers and families who developed Duarte, the local schools, and the local citrus industry..

Community Arts Resources, Inc. (CARS)

Since 1989, CARS has been breaking down barriers between the public and the arts. It offers Los Angeles artists and artists visiting the area guidance and access to the local resources they need for their work and for reaching new audiences. CARS also consults on the production of events in public venues and on the creation of new public spaces for the arts in urban settings. CARS maintains a state-of-the-art database of over fifty-seven thousand artists, arts organizations, venues, and audience members. This contemporary and constantly updated database is used to provide mailing lists to artists and as a networking tool. In addition, CARS has published two resource guides for artists: Doing It Right in LA (1990) and Southern California Performing Arts Venues (1993). CARS is not a collecting organization.

Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society

The Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society's collection contains photo-graphs, books, pamphlets, documents, artifacts, and oral interviews dealing with the history of the West San Fernando Valley, with emphasis on the area that was originally known as Owensmouth and is now called Canoga Park. Among these materials are high school yearbooks from 1916 to the 1950s; publications from the local women's club; a thesis on the development of the town; clippings and scrapbooks; and ephemera from the chamber of commerce, the Lion's Club, and other local organizations. Permanent and rotating displays at the society's museum depict life in the San Fernando Valley from the days of the Chumash Indians through the Mexican Rancho era and the period of dry farming and grain growing in the 1800s to the transformation brought about by the arrival of aerospace industries in the 1950s and 1960s.

Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC)

SPARC’s MREC is one of the country’s largest repositories of information about murals and other forms of public art. SPARC produces, exhibits, and preserves public art works and is particularly committed to enhancing the visibility of work which reflects the lives and concerns of American’s diverse ethnic populations, women, working people, youth and elderly. We have an extensive collection of journals, magazines, newspaper articles, over 30,000 slides and artists registry which are visited by hundreds of students, educators, scholars, artists, and art historians. Our tours highlight the community based public art works, which communicate the voices and visions of the complex neighborhoods of Los Angeles. The collection of renowned Chicana artist and SPARC’s Founder/Artistic Director, Judith F. Baca’s art work is managed by SPARC as well. We have the largest archives on murals, public art, graffiti, etc. in Los Angeles.