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UCLA Library Special Collections

Library Special Collections is the largest of the special collections units administered by the university and encompasses the following divisions: Rare Books; Manuscripts, Prints, Photographs, and Maps; Oral History; and University Archives. It acquires, organizes, preserves, and provides access to rare and unique materials in the humanities and social sciences. The holdings include three hundred thousand rare books, forty-two thousand linear feet of manuscript and archival collections, and four million photographic negatives and prints. In addition, the department’s nineteenth- and twentieth-century collections contain a variety of artifacts, audio recordings, videos, printed ephemera, oral history transcripts, phonograph records, postcards, and posters. The department acquires principally materials relating to the arts; California; area studies; ethnic studies; the history of printing, including atlases and early Italian books; and literature, including children’s books. Some of the department’s areas of specialization are Hebraica and Judaica; the history of philosophy; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies; natural resources; photography; travel and exploration; and women. The more than twenty-four hundred collections in the Department of Special Collections are managed by the divisions of. Each division’s holdings are selected or created to complement those of the other divisions. Researchers are welcome to discuss holdings at greater length with the staff.

South Pasadena Public Library, South Pasadena Historical Archives

The City of South Pasadena Historical Archives contain primarily material pertaining to the history of the South Pasadena area, with some of the material dating to before the city’s incorporation. Included are files on city buildings listed in the National Registry of Historical Landmarks, biographies of prominent government officials, city telephone directories dating back to 1885, and an extensive collection of photographs. The business, residential, and city documents in the archives range from chamber of commerce publications to records related to the history of the city’s school system.

Philosophical Research Society

Founded in 1934, the Philosophical Research Society is a nonsectarian center for the study and teaching of the world’s wisdom traditions. The Philosophical Research Society Library’s holdings provide a range of information about various countries and philosophies. The holdings include books, many of which are rare or out of print, on subjects such as Sir Francis Bacon, the Orient (India, Near East, Far East, Tibet, China, and Japan), Egypt, North and South American Indians, mythology, biography, psychic phenomena, alchemy, metaphysics, lost continents, divination, art and architecture, medicine, psychology, astrology, theosophy, literature, history, Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, and Masonry.

Pacific Palisades Historical Society

The collections of the Pacific Palisades Historical Society deal with the history of Rancho Boca de Santa Monica; the Chautauqua movement; the Methodist community from 1921 to 1943; the Uplifters Club from 1921 to 1945; the Westside community of German émigrés from 1934 to 1943; Will Rogers; J. Paul Getty and the Parker Ranch; the film industry; beach culture; the now-nonexistent Bernheimer Gardens; and architecture, especially the Case Study houses and the buildings in the Craftsman and the International architectural styles in the area. The society's holdings on the Chautauqua center that existed in Pacific Palisades from 1922 to 1936 are extensive and particularly interesting because the center's activities reveal the concerns at the heart of intellectual, social, and religious life in the Los Angeles region during those years.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Mr. & Mrs. Allan C. Balch Research Library

In the collection of the Mr. and Mrs. Allan C. Balch Art Research Library are posters and other pieces of ephemera relating to local exhibitions, artists, and organizations; all of this material is arranged in vertical files. The artist and gallery exhibition files include thousands of items of documentation on the artists living and working in Los Angeles and the galleries where they have shown their work. Included are announcements for many of the significant galleries of the early Los Angeles art scene—Ankrum, Asher/Faure, Baum/Silverman, Terry DeLapp, Dwan, Ferus, Dalzell Hatfield, Paul Kantor, Felix Landau, Frank Perls, Esther Robles, Stendahl, and David Stuart, among others.

Claremont Colleges, Honnold/Mudd Library, Special Collections

The Special Collections holdings reflect the diverse communities of the Claremont Colleges and the local area and region. Among the collections especially pertinent to Los Angeles and Southern California are the following: • McPherson Collection: books on California history, particularly Southern California and Orange County; records and papers, the bulk of which are about agriculture and avocado culture, and miscellaneous correspondence, 1773-1856 • Mission San Gabriel Marriage Investigation: manuscript records of matrimonial investigations, 1788–1861 • Lindley Scrapbooks: documentation of business and civic events in Los Angeles, late 1800s–early 1900s, compiled by Dr. Walter Lindley, founder of the California Hospital, mayoral candidate in 1904, and board member of the Los Angeles City Library • Kewen Dorsey Collection: twenty-five manuscript diaries, 1879–1904, documenting Dorsey’s life in Spadra, Pomona and Los Angeles • Archives of the Claremont Colleges: includes publications, records, photographs, and ephemera that document the history of the seven Claremont Colleges (Pomona College, Claremont Graduate University, Scripps College, Claremont McKenna College [formerly Claremont Men’s College], Harvey Mudd College, Pitzer College, Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences), 1880–present • Claremontiana: early documents, maps, photographs, oral histories, and publications of the town of Claremont, circa 1887–present • Congregational Church Records: institutional records, circa 1888–1963, from a number of Congregational Church organizations in Southern California; papers from women’s organizations account for more than one-third of the collection • Rude-Frankenfield Papers: papers that present the daily lives of at least six generations of the female side of the Rude-Frankenfield family, circa 1895–1971 • Water Resources Collection: includes ephemeral materials on the distribution, augmentation, and use of water in Los Angeles and Southern California, circa 1900–present • George Martin Scrapbooks: one hundred three scrapbooks, 1900–1962, assembled by this California banker and civic leader • Elbert A. Wickes Collection: materials from this Los Angeles-based impresario and manager of lecture tours for celebrities who also acted as the American representative for various English and Irish theatrical groups, including the Abbey Players, early 1900s • H. Jerry Voorhis Papers: papers, circa 1919–1984, from this founder of the Voorhis School for Boys in Claremont, U.S. congressman for California’s twelfth district (1936–1946), member of the Dies Committee on Un-American Activities, and head of the Cooperative League of America after losing his congressional seat to Richard M. Nixon in 1946 • Zamarano Club Keepsake Collection: publications from book collectors, printers, and librarians who are members of this famous Los Angeles book collectors club, 1928–present • Marion Parks Papers: historical photographs, some possibly by Charles Fletcher Lummis; manuscripts and printed pamphlets, 1930s–1950s, used by Parks while researching for publications and historical pageants on Southern California • Rev. Walton E. Cole Papers: correspondence, newspaper clippings, and publications by this Unitarian minister from Toledo, Ohio, who in the 1930s challenged through radio broadcasts the pro-Nazi and anti-Semitic views of “radio priest” Father Charles E. Coughlin • Howard D. Mills Collection: documentation of the U.S. government’s World War II finance efforts, including war bond drives, in Southern California, 1940–1945 • Carey McWilliams Collection of War Relocation Authority Records: reports, opinions, books, periodicals, and correspondence with evacuees that were assembled by McWilliams while he was writing Prejudice (1944), as well as sixty-six volumes of newspapers from War Relocation Authority centers and the minutes of the Japanese American Citizens League National Conference; 1942–1947

Beverly Hills Public Library Historical Collection

Our mission is to identify, collect, preserve, exhibit and make available to the public information that documents the history of the City of Beverly Hills. The time frame of our collection is from the 1840s to the present. Included in our collection are photographs, correspondence, newspapers, telephone directories, biographies, maps, posters, government and political documents, architectural plans, data on public works, texts and ephemera. Key collections are: Pierce Edson Benedict, Surveyor Field Books (1920s - 1960), Greystone (Doheny Mansion), Beverly Hills City Directories (1926 - present), Wright MacMahon Secretarial School, Cartography: Maps & Plans, Beverly Hills High School Yearbooks, newspapers and other material relating to the City. The Beverly Hills Citizen is digitized from 1923 through 1958.

University of California, Los Angeles, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library

The William Andrews Clark Memorial Library is a rare books and manuscripts collection, with particular strengths in English literature and history (1641–1800), Oscar Wilde, and fine printing. Though the majority of the Clark's collections are focused on Great Britain, the library still maintains significant Los Angeles-related collections. In particular, the library's collections in the fields of fine printing and graphic arts contain personal archives, published works and original art by Los Angeles-area fine printers and artists such as Ward Ritchie, Paul Landacre, Saul and Lillian Marks (Plantin Press), Patrick Reagh, Vance Gerry (Weatherbird Press), and Grant Dahlstrom. The Clark's own institutional archive contains materials on the library's founder, William Andrews Clark, Jr. (a patron of the arts in Los Angeles and a founder of the Los Angeles Philharmonic), the library's growth as a part of UCLA from 1934 to the present, and various plans, drawings and other materials related to the library's 1924-1926 design and construction by architect Robert D. Farquhar.

Self Help Graphics and Art, Inc.

Since 1972, Self-Help Graphics has illuminated and preserved the work of Chicano/Mexicano artists in the Los Angeles area and promoted Chicano art as a rich and vital part of American culture. Through community-based lending and collection practices, the organization created and has sustained a vital presence in the local and broader communities. The organization's collection comprises over three hundred pieces of framed Chicano artwork and a very large number of silk-screened prints and monotypes by Chicano artists, primarily from the Los Angeles area, which reflect Chicano/Mexicano experience. Self-Help Graphics owns as well slides, videos, and primary resource materials that offer a comprehensive history of the Chicano art movement in Los Angeles. Its holdings also document the twenty-seven-year history of Self-Help Graphics as a cultural and creative center.

Educational Communications

Established in 1958, Educational Communications is dedicated to improving the quality of life on this planet by creating greater awareness of environmental issues. Educational Communications currently holds 600 ECONEWS shows, an Emmy-nominated weekly television series airing on cable and PBS stations and the internet (Youtube); 2200 Environmental Directions radio shows, original audio recordings of the Environmental Directions international radio series, a half-hour interview show that airs on public, commercial, and listener-sponsored, in the United States and worldwide on the internet; two hundred original audio recordings of the Environmental Viewpoints radio series, a magazine-style program that provides news and information, including a calendar of events, music, interviews, and special conference coverage; and sixty original audio recordings of the one-hour shows in the Planet Health radio series. It has 45 years of The Compendium Newsletter (six issues per year; 270 editions). In addition to archival materials for Project Ecotourism, Educational Communications holds papers, letters, photographs, and other materials documenting over fifty years of ecoactivism by the Ecology Center of Southern California and sixty years for Educational Communications including the Oscar-nomination plaque for a documentary. Among the organization's Southern California memorabilia are records, correspondence, photographs, newsletters, and brochures related to the Ecology Center's first Earth Day, which occurred in 1970. The collection also covers the activities of environmental activists in the area. The Environmental Resources Library has over 2000 autographed books about the environment. Other projects include Humanity and the Planet which donates educational supplies and books to groups around the world, and Earth Cultures which presents ethnic folk dance performances and has a collection of dance videos and music. The facility in Idyllwild, California, is now on the National Registry of Historic Places and is available for photo shoots, retreats, meetings, and public visits.