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Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Lillian Fellows Memorial Archive

Childrens Hospital Society of Los Angeles was established in 1901 by a small group of women who recognized the need for a hospital that could serve ill, crippled, and under-privileged children. The original hospital, opened in 1902, was a modest two-story, canary-yellow, clapboard house. It had nine beds, was served by one volunteer doctor and treated fourteen patients its first year. By 1905, the hospital had expanded to accommodate twenty patients, the kitchen pantry converted in to a surgery suite, and 229 children had received care. The hospital soon after received two generous donations- one of land, the other of real-property, which made possible a relocation and expansion of the hospital, and in 1913, Childrens Hospital opened a 100-bed facility in a remote, unincorporated part of the city at Sunset & Vermont Avenues. Subsequent years of tireless and ingenious fund raising efforts by all-female board of directors, managers, and auxiliaries produced steady income for the non-profit hospital. Today, CHLA is a national leader in pediatric care and research and serves over 300,000 patients annually at its four-acre facility. The Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Lillian Fellows Memorial Archive is named for the daughter of Emma Phillips, the donor who bequeathed the land upon which the current hospital is situated. Mrs. Phillips’ gift stipulated that her deceased daughter’s portrait hang for fifty years in the new hospital, and that portrait now serves as the cornerstone of the archive collection. Development of the archive began in 2000 with the collection and assessment of historical materials for research on the book, “Childrens Hospital and the Leaders of Los Angeles: The First 100 Years,” by Margaret Leslie Davis, published in conjunction with the CHLA Centennial Celebration. The archive is home to a variety of materials, including photographs, medical records, publications, scrapbooks, diaries, documents, artwork, and artifacts. Photographic images include hospital founders, patients, doctors, administrators, campus development, and regional images of general historic interest. The archive contains complete collections dating from 1901 through 1940 of annual reports, admissions logs, medical procedures summaries, and daily census reports, as well as monthly newsletters published since 1940. The records of Mrs. Gabriel Duque, long term Chair of the Associates & Affiliates and CHLA Board member, are preserved in the archive, as are generous donations of historic materials from various auxiliary groups including fund-raising records, annual Doll Fair, Fashion Show, and Debutante Ball scrapbooks, administration files, meeting minutes, 1940s Debutante Registers, publicity brochures, and a variety of World War II memorabilia. Also housed in the archive are oral histories of hospital administrators, doctors, nurses, and volunteers gathered under the auspices of the Centennial Celebration project.

W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library

One of the world’s largest public collections of Arabian horse materials, the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library collection consists of materials in print and non-print format. The collection is intended to be used as a research facility by the University community as well as all who are interested in the Arabian horse. The WKKAHL collection does not circulate, though exceptions may be made for special circumstances. The Library also maintains a small Arabian horse art collection, which includes paintings, drawings, and sculpture. The collection includes current, as well as rare and out-of-print books, pamphlets, artwork, brochures, newsletters, videotapes, DVDs, periodicals, newspapers, photographs, letters, manuscripts, and reports pertaining to the Arabian horse. An extensive selection of foreign and domestic stud books are in the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library. Stud books from governmental and private registries are included, as are stud books from breeding programs no longer in existence. Periodicals are a significant element of the collection. Newsletters from many Arabian horse clubs are maintained; Arabian horse breeders farm brochures are also kept. The collection also includes video, such as farm movies, video magazines, and feature films. The WKKAHL houses two special collections. The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch Papers include files on the history of the Ranch and breeding program, as well as an assortment of materials that document and give insight into W.K. Kellogg’s life with Arabian horses, including video footage, artifacts, newspaper clippings, press releases, scrapbooks, personal correspondence, realia, and ephemera. The Gladys Brown Edwards Collection includes art (paintings, drawings, sculpture) and books written and acquired by Gladys Brown Edwards, as well as articles by and about her.

Cal Poly Pomona, Special Collections and University Archives

Subject strengths: local history, wine, cookbooks, poetry, botany, mycology, philosophy, art and architecture. Collections: University Archives, Cal Poly Rose Float Collection, Wine Industry Collection, The Thomas Pinney Collection of wine books and wine related research files, the United Farm Workers Collection, Virginia Hamilton Adair Collection, First Edition Collection, John Gill Modern Poetry Collection, Abraham Kaplan Collection, League of Women Voters (East San Gabriel Valley) Collection, Academic Senate Archive, Low magazine archive (student underground newspaper), Cal Poly Women's Club, Student Wives Club, Voorhis School for Boys, Voorhis Family, Robert Lawrence Balzer Collection, World Menu Collection, Kennedy Collection, Humphrey Mycology Collection. Campus History: Cal Poly Pomona was originally founded in San Dimas in 1938, as an all male agricultural/horticultural southern branch campus of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. In 1949 the college acquired the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch in Pomona where it moved the campus in 1956. In 1961 it went coed and in 1966 separated from San Luis Obispo. In 1972, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona was awarded full university status. The University Archives, which document this history includes: photographs, books, records, memorabilia, architectural drawings, sound and video recordings, newspaper clippings and scrapbooks. The University Archives also include materials from the Voorhis School for Boys--the San Dimas institution for orphaned and underprivileged boys that originally inhabited the site of what later became the San Dimas/Voorhis campus of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Charles Voorhis built the school and his son H. Jerry Voorhis was headmaster. The school operated from 1928 to 1938, when Jerry Voorhis was elected to Congress. In 1938 Charles Voorhis donated the school facility to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo to be its Southern California branch. This permitted students to gain experience with cultivation of important "sub-tropical" crops such as oranges. Materials include photographs, film, video, DVDs, books, files, memorabilia, and architectural drawings. The Wine Industry Collection documents all aspects of the wine industry in Southern California, beginning with the Missions. This collection includes books, journals, newspapers, photographs, oral histories, posters, files, winery memorabilia, video recordings, news clippings, wine labels, wine bottles, medals, and wine club newsletters.

Angels Gate Cultural Center

Angels Gate is a nonprofit membership organization dedicated to promoting the visual and performing arts and to the celebration of ethnic and cultural diversity through exhibitions, concerts, classes, workshops, and poetry readings. Founded in 1981, Angels Gate rents studio space to forty artists and exhibits their work. The annual exhibition schedule includes both a series of group shows (seven to eight per year) and a featured-artist-of-the-month series. Although Angels Gate is not a collecting organization, the site itself and the ten buildings that Angels Gate occupies are historic, and Angels Gate owns several steel sculptures that are on permanent display on the site.

Western Costume Company

Since 1912, Western Costume Company has supplied costumes for film, television, stage, and school productions. In 1915, this costume house established the first production research library. Today the library’s holdings document what people around the world have worn throughout the ages. The library’s archival holdings consist of costume sketches, historic costumes, and the Twentieth Century Fox costume still collection from the late 1930s -1970s.

Los Angeles City Archives

In the Los Angeles City Archives are the official municipal government records of the City of Los Angeles, including city council files, city ordinances, and city council minutes. The archives also contain the records of cities that have consolidated with Los Angeles and are now considered communities.

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument is the oldest section of Los Angeles. Its twenty-seven historic buildings clustered around an old plaza range in architectural style from an adobe dwelling of 1818 to a Spanish-style church of 1926. Four of the buildings have been restored as museums. A brochure describing the buildings is available at the Information Desk in the Plaza or at the El Pueblo Visitors’ Center in the Sepulveda House. El Pueblo’s docent organization, Las Angelitas del Pueblo, provides free tours to groups (Tuesday–Saturday, 10 am–1 pm; call 213-628-1274). El Pueblo’s archaeological collection consists of artifacts uncovered during excavations in the El Pueblo area since 1972. Dating from the indigenous or Native American period (before 1781), the Spanish colonial era (1781–1821), the Mexican era (1821–1848), and the first century of the American era (1850s–1940s), these artifacts include numerous “trash pit” shards such as animal bones, household goods, tools, bottles, and ceramics. El Pueblo also holds a range of archival materials relating to the site and its history.

Paley Center for Media

The Museum of Television & Radio, with locations in New York and Los Angeles, is a non-profit organization founded by William S. Paley to collect and preserve television and radio programs and advertisements and to make them available to the public. Since opening in 1976, the museum has organized exhibitions, screening and listening series, seminars, and education classes to showcase its collection of over 100,000 television and radio programs and advertisements. In 2001, the museum initiated a process to acquire Internet programming for the collection. Programs in the museum's permanent collection are selected for their artistic, cultural, and historic significance.

University of California, Santa Barbara, University Art Museum, Architecture and Design Collection

UCSB professor David Gebhard (1927-1996) founded the Architecture and Design Collection in 1963. Today it is one of the largest architectural archives in North America with more than 1,000,000 drawings, as well as papers, photographs, scrapbooks, models, decorative objects, and furniture. The focus of the collection is the design and architecture of southern California from the late 19th through the early 21st century. More than 230 collections and archives make up the ADC, a portrait of design in the region through the work of well-known figures such as Irving Gill, John Byers, Roland Coate, Sr., George Washington Smith, Myron Hunt and Harold Chambers, Robert Stacy-Judd, R. M. Schindler, Lutah Maria Riggs, Thornton Abell, Gregory Ain, Julius R. Davidson, Palmer Sabin, Kem Weber, Whitney Smith and Wayne Williams, John Woolf, Edward Killingsworth, Rex Lotery, Maynard Lyndon, and Barton Myers, among others.

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Seaver Center for Western History Research

The Seaver Center for Western History Research collects, preserves, and makes available to the general public and to scholars historic records pertaining to the history and the exploration of the trans-Mississippi American West, with particular emphasis on Southern California and Los Angeles. Its historic records holdings include (but are not limited to) manuscript materials, books, serials, trade catalogs, pamphlets, broadsides, maps, posters, prints, photographs, and a historic site file listing information on some eight hundred fifty buildings in Southern California. The Seaver Center also acquires research materials that support History Division exhibits and research by History Division curators.