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Los Angeles United Methodist Museum of Social Justice

The Museum of Social Justice is located in La Plaza Methodist Church, on the site of the oldest section of Los Angeles. The Museum’s historical collection consists of documents, photographs, artifacts, and other materials created by La Plaza Methodist Church at the beginning of the twentieth century. The collection features over 2000 photographs that capture the work of the founders of the church, its community center, and the predominantly poor Mexican immigrant population the church was founded to serve. The documents provide a look into the poor living conditions that existed near the Plaza and how La Plaza Church's social justice practices improved the lives of many of the immigrants living on and near the Plaza.

University of California, Los Angeles, Chicano Studies Research Center Library and Archive

Established in 1969, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center (CSRC) Library and Archive was the first library of its kind and is now the only freestanding Chicano studies library in the United States. It provides information resources, reference services, and bibliographic instruction for those seeking information on the Chicano experience. The library makes its holdings accessible to users from UCLA and from around the world. Although the CSRC was originally founded to ensure preservation and accessibility of the Chicano experience, it is now becoming the repository of choice for Latino donors in general. The collection includes over 16,000 monographs, approximately 300 serial titles, a large collection of theses and dissertations, over 40,000 digital objects - many of them accessible on the UCLA Digital Library, and a large collection of posters, a/v materials, and a growing collection of archival holdings totalling close to 2,000 linear feet of material. Please note that we are a non-circulating library. Most items may be scanned or photocopied onsite. If you wish to access one of our special collections, please contact us before you visit to make appropriate arrangements.

W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library

One of the world’s largest public collections of Arabian horse materials, the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library collection consists of materials in print and non-print format. The collection is intended to be used as a research facility by the University community as well as all who are interested in the Arabian horse. The WKKAHL collection does not circulate, though exceptions may be made for special circumstances. The Library also maintains a small Arabian horse art collection, which includes paintings, drawings, and sculpture. The collection includes current, as well as rare and out-of-print books, pamphlets, artwork, brochures, newsletters, videotapes, DVDs, periodicals, newspapers, photographs, letters, manuscripts, and reports pertaining to the Arabian horse. An extensive selection of foreign and domestic stud books are in the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library. Stud books from governmental and private registries are included, as are stud books from breeding programs no longer in existence. Periodicals are a significant element of the collection. Newsletters from many Arabian horse clubs are maintained; Arabian horse breeders farm brochures are also kept. The collection also includes video, such as farm movies, video magazines, and feature films. The WKKAHL houses two special collections. The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch Papers include files on the history of the Ranch and breeding program, as well as an assortment of materials that document and give insight into W.K. Kellogg’s life with Arabian horses, including video footage, artifacts, newspaper clippings, press releases, scrapbooks, personal correspondence, realia, and ephemera. The Gladys Brown Edwards Collection includes art (paintings, drawings, sculpture) and books written and acquired by Gladys Brown Edwards, as well as articles by and about her.

Center for the Study of Political Graphics

The Center for the Study of Political Graphics is an educational and research archive that collects, preserves, documents, and exhibits domestic and international poster art. The Center’s domestic and international collection of more than 60,000 political posters dates from the early 20th century to the present, and includes the largest collection of post World War II political posters in the United States. The posters are produced in a variety of artistic mediums— offset, silk screen, lithography, woodblock, linocut, stencil, photocopy, and computer-generated prints. The collection is focused on international, domestic, and Los Angeles-specific human rights issues, with an emphasis on progressive movements in the United States, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Australia. Poster topics include the women’s movement, racism, peace, apartheid, labor, liberation theology, AIDS, gay and lesbian rights, immigrants’ rights, children’s rights, and ecology. Between one and two thousand posters are acquired annually, primarily through donation. Approximately half of these are given by collectors in Los Angeles and reflect the diverse political interests of the donors. This has yielded a collection that, in part, documents important but often underrepresented aspects of local history and life in the Los Angeles area. The collection contains approximately three thousand human rights and protest posters produced in Los Angeles from 1965 to the present. The earliest of these came out of the Watts Uprising of 1965, while the more recent posters not only reflect prevailing concerns but commemorate older events, such as the U.S. government’s internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Altogether, the posters illustrate the commitment of many Los Angeles-based artists, organizations, and individuals to a variety of social and political issues over the last five decades.