Native American Languages

Yosemite National Park Archive

Several Los Angeles engineering and architectural firms were involved in the design of buildings, bridges, and other iconic features of Yosemite National Park. From 1923-1927, the National Park Service Landscape Division was located in the offices of the Underwood Building on Spring Street in LA. Architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood and Landscape Engineer Daniel P. Hull collaborated on several national park projects including the construction of Yosemite's Ahwahnee Lodge. Los Angeles resident and architect Charles T. Gutleben developed designs for cables on Half Dome, and his company also was involved in other Yosemite projects including the construction of the Rangers Club, the Yosemite Museum, Le Conte Memorial Lodge, and many of the bridges in Yosemite Valley. The Yosemite Archives contains correspondence, plans, and drawings referring to many of these projects.

National Archives at Riverside

We are a unit of the National Archives and Records Administration. Our holdings consist of the historically significant materials created by Federal agencies in southern California, Arizona and the greater Las Vegas, Nevada area. Agencies represented include the U.S. District Courts, the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service. Our records document the complicated relationship between the Federal government and the people of southern California, including the role of the Navy and the Immigration and Naturalization Service in the evacuation of Japanese and Japanese-Americans during World War II; the struggle for civil rights such as the desegregation of California schools in the landmark case, Mendez v. Westminster. Our District Court records contain cases of sedition, prohibition violations, obscenity and the struggle for free speech. Our holdings of the Bureau of Indian Affairs not only record the culture and history of southern California's Mission Indians, but also the work of the Los Angeles Employment Assistance Office, which worked between 1947 and the 1970s to relocate Native Peoples from rural reservations to learn trades in the Los Angeles area. We have records that document the growth of Hollywood as an industry and the lives of the people who worked there including the naturalizations of many Golden Age actors such as Cary Grant, Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland and others. The records of the U.S. District Court also document the development of technology and intellectual property rights in the film industry. The settlement and growth of southern California is documented here. Our holdings document the management of public lands, including homesteading, ranching and mining. We have records created by the Federal government related to the growth of aerospace industry giants such as Lockheed, Douglas Aircraft and Hughes Aircraft. Included is information on the research and development of aircraft such as the H-4 flying boat (the Spruce Goose) and the Bell XS-1. Also represented are records related to labor relations during World War II. The records of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers document their work on flood control in the Los Angeles river system, including the iconic channelization of the LA River.

Center for Oral and Public History/California State University, Fullerton

Collections include 5,000+ oral histories in 250 projects, representing geographical, ethnic, political, religious, and social communities of selected Orange County, Los Angeles, Southern California, and Western US locales. Topics include community histories, environmental studies, including Sierra Club, Laguna Beach Greenbelt, Bolsa Chica, ethnic studies (African American, Native American, Mexican American, Japanese American, Judaica Studies, Vietnamese Americans), politics and government (Orange County politics, conservative women), society and culture (sulf culture, surf music, women with silicone breast implants, sports and society in Cold War Southern California, theater, baseball, women in long-term marriages, transformation of grocery stores, and new wave in Czechoslovakian film, 1990s UCI fertility clinic scandal, Mormon colonies in Mexico), just to name a few.

Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic Park

The Museum exhibits American Indian cultural materials, primarily focused on cultures of the Southwestern, Great Basin and Californian culture regions, which were connected by a major trade route from circa 4,000 BP. One of the largest collections is from the California coast and Channel Islands. Seven thousand artifacts are represented, ranging in age from 8-9,000 BP to ethnographic/historic times.

American Indian Resource Center, LA County Library

The American Indian Resource Center was established in 1979 by the County of Los Angeles Public Library to address information needs for and about American Indians. With over 10,000 items, AIRC is the largest collection of its kind in an American public library. Our clientele is local, national, and international. The scope of the collection is the continental U.S. and Alaska from pre-Columbian times to the present, with emphasis on California and the Southwest, tribal studies, history, current affairs, and legal issues. Because of the large volume of specialized materials, AIRC has a unique subject classification system under such categories as California Tribes, Urban Indians, American Indians in Film, Teachers' Resources, Tribal Sovereignty, Federal Indian Law, and other specific categories under general categories of history, education, economics, culture, languages, genealogy, health, law, and current affairs. In addition to books, tribal and American Indian newsletters and newspapers, government documents (some dating from the mid-1800's), theses and dissertations, audio and audio-visual materials including audio cassettes, VHS, DVD's, CD's, and 8 and 16mm films, and a Community Information section, AIRC has copies of rare materials, primarily on microfilm, usually found in academic institutions and government archives including U.S. government documents such as Indian Census Rolls dating from the 1820's, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, California Superintendency, 1849-1880, the complete set of the Records of the Indian Claims Commission 1946-1976, and others. Microfilm holdings also include 131 tribal and American Indian organization newspapers, dissertations and theses, records of Indian organizations, oral histories, rare microfilmed books, government publications, and other materials. AIRC has files of clippings about cultural practices, historic events, historic figures, and information about American Indian community issues, community organizations, and community members accumulated from 1979 to 2000. AIRC staff participate in powwows and other American Indian community events, with local American Indian organizations, colleges and universities, and local and national government institutions, all of which are continuous sources for additional materials. Because AIRC is in a public library environment, the collection is not confined by the rules and restrictions standard in academic and government institutions, providing better and easier access to the materials.