Farsi

Shelley Gazin

Cross-section of Urban population and events including portraits of Creative Professional, Entrepreneurs, Scientists, Political & Religious Leaders, Persian-Americans

W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library

One of the world’s largest public collections of Arabian horse materials, the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library collection consists of materials in print and non-print format. The collection is intended to be used as a research facility by the University community as well as all who are interested in the Arabian horse. The WKKAHL collection does not circulate, though exceptions may be made for special circumstances. The Library also maintains a small Arabian horse art collection, which includes paintings, drawings, and sculpture. The collection includes current, as well as rare and out-of-print books, pamphlets, artwork, brochures, newsletters, videotapes, DVDs, periodicals, newspapers, photographs, letters, manuscripts, and reports pertaining to the Arabian horse. An extensive selection of foreign and domestic stud books are in the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library. Stud books from governmental and private registries are included, as are stud books from breeding programs no longer in existence. Periodicals are a significant element of the collection. Newsletters from many Arabian horse clubs are maintained; Arabian horse breeders farm brochures are also kept. The collection also includes video, such as farm movies, video magazines, and feature films. The WKKAHL houses two special collections. The W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch Papers include files on the history of the Ranch and breeding program, as well as an assortment of materials that document and give insight into W.K. Kellogg’s life with Arabian horses, including video footage, artifacts, newspaper clippings, press releases, scrapbooks, personal correspondence, realia, and ephemera. The Gladys Brown Edwards Collection includes art (paintings, drawings, sculpture) and books written and acquired by Gladys Brown Edwards, as well as articles by and about her.

California State University, Northridge, Delmar T. Oviatt Library, Special Collections and Archives

Special Collections and Archives in the Oviatt Library is the home of CSUN's rare book and periodical collections, as well as its archival and manuscript collections. Archival and manuscript collections can consist of many different kinds of materials, including correspondence, diaries, maps, university records, organizational records, photographs, and audio or video recordings. The department is comprised of several areas within the Oviatt Library which were independently established between 1973 and 1996. Special Collections was established in 1973 to house the Library’s manuscripts, rare books, periodicals, maps, prints, and art. Special Collections holds over 35,000 cataloged items and 150 manuscript and archival collections which support the University's curriculum, as well as the research interests of faculty and students on campus. In addition to supporting curricular needs at California State University, Northridge, collecting is focused on several topical areas including American literature, California and the West, children's literature, the history of printing and publishing, human sexuality, music, 19th and 20th century Europe, radio and television scripts, religion, theater and motion pictures, and United States history. The Urban Archives was established in 1979 through the efforts of university faculty, concerned community organizations, and civic leaders. Its purpose is to collect historically significant records of voluntary associations, local political figures, prominent citizens, and civic leaders which have contributed to the growth of Los Angeles County, and influenced government and public thinking since the beginning of the late nineteenth century. The collections document urban development in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, education, journalism in Southern California, labor and guild history, minority and ethnic studies, politicians and political movements, social service and women in Los Angeles. The University Archives is the repository for the historical papers of California State University, Northridge's administration, Faculty Senate, schools and departments, and student activities on campus. The International Guitar Research Archives (IGRA) was founded in 1980, and now holds one of the world’s largest collections of guitar sheet music, especially works for solo guitar, ensemble pieces for multiple guitars, and ensemble pieces for guitar and other instruments. IGRA also holds accompanying resources documenting the lives and careers of numerous guitarists and professional associations, as well as other guitar-related materials. The Old China Hands Archives was established in 1996 to preserve and publicize the heritage of the many people from other countries and cultures who have resided and worked in China. The Archives holds a growing collection of materials generously donated by former Old China Hands, including correspondence, diaries, photographs, postcards, books, periodicals, newspapers, and other materials.

University of California, Los Angeles, Institute for Social Science Research, Social Science Data Ar

The Social Science Data Archives maintains a collection of machine-readable survey, census, and administrative data files and provides access to publicly available data. A portion of the collection is focused on Los Angeles from a demographic, economic, social, or political viewpoint. Los Angeles-specific data may also be extracted from files in the collection that contain data from studies covering demographic areas larger than Los Angeles. To access and use the data in the files, researchers must know how to run one of the statistical software packages supported by Social Sciences Computing, such as SAS, SPSS, or STATA. Among the holdings specific to Los Angeles are data files from the Mexican American Study Project, a survey of the Hispanic community in Los Angeles (1960–1968); the Los Angeles County Social Survey, an annual survey of residents’ perceptions on a range of social, ethnic, political, and economic issues (1970–1998); and a number of U.S. Department of Justice surveys on crime, gangs, riots, and other social phenomena in twentieth-century Los Angeles. In addition to documentation for the data files, the holdings include the Eve Feidler Library, which comprises a small collection of books and pamphlets related to survey methodology, statistical analysis, and social policy.

UCLA Library Special Collections

Library Special Collections is the largest of the special collections units administered by the university and encompasses the following divisions: Rare Books; Manuscripts, Prints, Photographs, and Maps; Oral History; and University Archives. It acquires, organizes, preserves, and provides access to rare and unique materials in the humanities and social sciences. The holdings include three hundred thousand rare books, forty-two thousand linear feet of manuscript and archival collections, and four million photographic negatives and prints. In addition, the department’s nineteenth- and twentieth-century collections contain a variety of artifacts, audio recordings, videos, printed ephemera, oral history transcripts, phonograph records, postcards, and posters. The department acquires principally materials relating to the arts; California; area studies; ethnic studies; the history of printing, including atlases and early Italian books; and literature, including children’s books. Some of the department’s areas of specialization are Hebraica and Judaica; the history of philosophy; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies; natural resources; photography; travel and exploration; and women. The more than twenty-four hundred collections in the Department of Special Collections are managed by the divisions of. Each division’s holdings are selected or created to complement those of the other divisions. Researchers are welcome to discuss holdings at greater length with the staff.

Center for the Study of Political Graphics

The Center for the Study of Political Graphics is an educational and research archive that collects, preserves, documents, and exhibits domestic and international poster art. The Center’s domestic and international collection of more than 60,000 political posters dates from the early 20th century to the present, and includes the largest collection of post World War II political posters in the United States. The posters are produced in a variety of artistic mediums— offset, silk screen, lithography, woodblock, linocut, stencil, photocopy, and computer-generated prints. The collection is focused on international, domestic, and Los Angeles-specific human rights issues, with an emphasis on progressive movements in the United States, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Australia. Poster topics include the women’s movement, racism, peace, apartheid, labor, liberation theology, AIDS, gay and lesbian rights, immigrants’ rights, children’s rights, and ecology. Between one and two thousand posters are acquired annually, primarily through donation. Approximately half of these are given by collectors in Los Angeles and reflect the diverse political interests of the donors. This has yielded a collection that, in part, documents important but often underrepresented aspects of local history and life in the Los Angeles area. The collection contains approximately three thousand human rights and protest posters produced in Los Angeles from 1965 to the present. The earliest of these came out of the Watts Uprising of 1965, while the more recent posters not only reflect prevailing concerns but commemorate older events, such as the U.S. government’s internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Altogether, the posters illustrate the commitment of many Los Angeles-based artists, organizations, and individuals to a variety of social and political issues over the last five decades.

Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel

The collections of the Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel relate to early Los Angeles religious history. They include two to three hundred photographs, correspondence between the president of the temple's community and the public, ephemera, newsletters, and sundry items connected to the Sephardic community's history in Los Angeles since 1912. The collection also includes information on the Sephardic Heritage Awards, audiocassettes of music and speeches by rabbis, videos of events at the temple, and a book about King Juan Carlos and Queen Sophia of Spain's royal visit to the temple in 1987. The archives contain documents about the construction of the temple on Wilshire Boulevard (for example, statements for and against in the form of correspondence, legal and otherwise), photographs, and newsletters dating back to 1946 in which the collections are described in part.