Chinese

Craft and Folk Art Museum Edith R. Wyle Research Library Collection

The Edith R. Wyle Research Library of the Craft and Folk Art Museum (CAFAM) was donated to the L.A. County Museum of Art Research Library in December 1997 during a period of consolidation for the Museum. (CAFAM reopened in April 1999 under the auspices of the City of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department.) The Edith R. Wyle Library's holdings reflect the exhibiting and collecting interests of the Craft and Folk Art Museum. It's holdings pertaining to traditional folk art, international contemporary craft and design, professional museum practice, cultural diversity, and cultural context are significant. It's particular strengths are in the areas of Mexican and Japanese folk art, masks and masking worldwide, and the history of folk art and craft collecting. Altogether the Wyle Research Library's holdings comprise approximately 5,500 books as well as exhibition catalogs, journals, newspaper clipping and pamphlet files, posters, biographical files on contemporary craft artists (including slides), and biographical files on self-taught artists. In 1994 the Bead Society of Los Angeles donated its library collection of about 200 books, catalogs, and ephemera on beads.

Visual Communications

Based in the Little Tokyo area of Downtown Los Angeles, VC was founded in 1970 by a group of pioneering independent filmmakers to record, collect, and preserve a visual record of Asian Pacific American cultural heritage. VC originally worked as a film collective, concentrating on honestly portraying accurate images of Asian Americans and meticulously capturing pivotal social movements. VC produced groundbreaking works about the Asian American experience, including: CHINATOWN 2-STEP, a documentary on the suburbanization of Chinese American community in Los Angeles and the role of the Chinatown Drum and Bugle Corps; MANONG, a film on the first generation Filipino American immigrants; and WATARIDORI, a documentary on early Japanese American immigrant pioneers. VC published three books, In Movement: A Pictorial History of Asian Pacific America, Little Tokyo: One Hundred Years in Pictures, and Moving the Image: Independent Asian Pacific American Media Arts. Productions were used for education and activism that addressed setting up ethnic studies programs on local campuses, city redevelopment issues, the redress campaign for Japanese Americans interned during World War II, and the declaration of martial law in the Philippines. VC’s own past in all media, narrative films, documentaries and educational projects are intertwined with the Asian Pacific American movements of the 1970s, and in itself represents a rich resource for researchers of the Asian Pacific American movements. The Archives’ purpose is to document the history of the organization by organizing, preserving, and creating access to a variety of media art and primary materials recording impactful political moments and depicting the Asian Pacific American heritage for staff use, as well as by scholars who are interested in Visual Communications’ role in the Asian American communities and history. The holdings include over 300,000 photographic images, 1,500 titles in the Media Resource Library, 100 films and videos produced by Visual Communications, and over 1,000 hours of oral histories of pan-Asian Pacific American content. As a valuable resource of Asian media art representations, The Archives is open to a wide variety of users, and we encourage the public, artists, filmmakers, students, faculty and others to pursue an intercultural understanding of the Asian American heritage. VC’s vision for the archives is to accurately reflect and represent the diversity of the American populace and to cement Asian Pacific American experiences in the historical record through the preservation, access, and dissemination of our materials, which provide historical context and insight of Asian Pacific American influence not only for Asian Pacific Americans, but also for all Americans. Please refer to our list of holdings for more information: http://fromthevcvault.wordpress.com/vc-archives-collections/

Los Angeles Harbor Department Historical Archives

The Collections within The Los Angeles Harbor Department Historical Archives document the development of The Los Angeles Harbor as well as the surrounding communities of San Pedro, Wilmington and Long Beach beginning in the late nineteenth century through today. The Archive maintains over 26,000 linear feet of materials including photographs, plans, drawings, books and assorted ephemera that have been generated during the course of official business and community outreach.

National Archives at Riverside

We are a unit of the National Archives and Records Administration. Our holdings consist of the historically significant materials created by Federal agencies in southern California, Arizona and the greater Las Vegas, Nevada area. Agencies represented include the U.S. District Courts, the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service. Our records document the complicated relationship between the Federal government and the people of southern California, including the role of the Navy and the Immigration and Naturalization Service in the evacuation of Japanese and Japanese-Americans during World War II; the struggle for civil rights such as the desegregation of California schools in the landmark case, Mendez v. Westminster. Our District Court records contain cases of sedition, prohibition violations, obscenity and the struggle for free speech. Our holdings of the Bureau of Indian Affairs not only record the culture and history of southern California's Mission Indians, but also the work of the Los Angeles Employment Assistance Office, which worked between 1947 and the 1970s to relocate Native Peoples from rural reservations to learn trades in the Los Angeles area. We have records that document the growth of Hollywood as an industry and the lives of the people who worked there including the naturalizations of many Golden Age actors such as Cary Grant, Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland and others. The records of the U.S. District Court also document the development of technology and intellectual property rights in the film industry. The settlement and growth of southern California is documented here. Our holdings document the management of public lands, including homesteading, ranching and mining. We have records created by the Federal government related to the growth of aerospace industry giants such as Lockheed, Douglas Aircraft and Hughes Aircraft. Included is information on the research and development of aircraft such as the H-4 flying boat (the Spruce Goose) and the Bell XS-1. Also represented are records related to labor relations during World War II. The records of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers document their work on flood control in the Los Angeles river system, including the iconic channelization of the LA River.

Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive

USC began its film program in 1929 and we house all the produced student films as well as Educational and Hollywood films dating back to the 1910's. Individual collections include unique production documents and ephemera, including photographs, set design art, legal documents. Many parts of Los Angeles have been represented such as Kent MacKenzies Bunker Hill 1956.

Chinese Historical Society of Southern California

The Chinese Historical Society of Southern California was founded in1975 to discover and recognize Chinese American pioneers and the history of Chinese Americans in Southern California. It also works to increase aware-ness of Chinese American heritage through public programs, education, and research. The society's holdings focus on Southern California Chinese American history. Its collections include three hundred transcriptions of oral history interviews with Southern Californian Chinese Americans, the Robert Nash Collection on Chinese junks and fisheries, artifacts from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority old Chinatown/Union Station excavation and the Santa Barbara Chinatown archaeological site, photographs of old Chinatown and China City, and three paintings of old Chinatown. Its archive contains extended summaries of the oral history interviews and a number of original documents. Some of the society's holdings are on display at the Chinatown Heritage and Visitors Center (411 Bernard Street).

Getty Research Institute, Research Library

Located on the Getty Center campus in Brentwood, the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute focuses on the history of art, architecture, and archaeology from prehistory to the contemporary period. Presently, the collections are strongest in the history of western European art and culture in Europe and North America; however, in recent years, they have expanded to include other areas, such as Latin America, Eastern Europe, and selected regions of Asia. The library's foundation lies in its special collections of original documents and objects. Recent acquisitions and initiatives have documented developments during the postwar years in Southern California. The special collections include contemporary artists' photographers' by Los Angeles artists; archives and manuscripts of Southern California artists, writers, and curators such as Sam Francis, Robert Irwin, and Henry Hopkins; archives of art publications such as High Performance magazine; prints, drawings, and multiples, including a complete set of those produced by Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions; rare photographs and photographers’ archives, such as Charles Brittin's; architectural drawings and comprehensive archives such as John Parkinson's drawings for Union Station, the Walt Disney Concert Hall documentation, the Pierre Koenig and John Lautner archives, and the Julius Shulman Photography Archive highlighting Los Angeles architecture. Documenting the advanced art that put Los Angeles and Southern California on the map of the international art world, Long Beach Museum of Art Video Archive, now part of the Research Library's collections, contains close to 5000 tapes and supporting files.

Center for Oral and Public History/California State University, Fullerton

Collections include 5,000+ oral histories in 250 projects, representing geographical, ethnic, political, religious, and social communities of selected Orange County, Los Angeles, Southern California, and Western US locales. Topics include community histories, environmental studies, including Sierra Club, Laguna Beach Greenbelt, Bolsa Chica, ethnic studies (African American, Native American, Mexican American, Japanese American, Judaica Studies, Vietnamese Americans), politics and government (Orange County politics, conservative women), society and culture (sulf culture, surf music, women with silicone breast implants, sports and society in Cold War Southern California, theater, baseball, women in long-term marriages, transformation of grocery stores, and new wave in Czechoslovakian film, 1990s UCI fertility clinic scandal, Mormon colonies in Mexico), just to name a few.

Asian Pacific Resource Center, LA County Library

The Asian Pacific Resource Center was established in 1979, to meet the information needs of a sudden influx of new immigrants from East and Southeast Asia. The center includes resources in English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese and Vietnamese. The emphasis of English language materials is on the Asian Pacific Islander American experience with a core collection on the culture, art, and history of China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, Vietnam and smaller holdings on Hawaii and American Samoa. The microfilm collection holds over 100 titles of historical Asian American / immigrant newspapers including documents and newspapers from the Japanese American Internment. Programs and book discussions at the center celebrate and explore the rich history and cultural heritage of Asian and Pacific Islander Americans. The Asian Pacific Resource Center provides reference service to researchers and to the general public. The center offers information and referral services to assist in locating agencies that address the needs of the Asian and Pacific Islander community. The Asian Pacific Resource Center strives to promote a deeper understanding and appreciation of the diverse cultures that form Los Angeles County.

Irene Fertik

Irene Fertik is a community artist, teacher, and photographer whose work has appeared in a variety of newspapers, magazines, and books. Her collection of photographs contains images of New York City in the decade from 1967 to 1977 (Black construction workers of all trades, Black theater, Black dance, jazz, civil rights activities, other aspects of Black life and culture), Israel, (kibbutz life, 1967-1968); Ethiopian Jews, 1992-present), and Los Angeles (amateur athletics, 1986; artists involved in community-based art projects, 1988; portraits of Black photographers, 1966). Her collection of photographs taken by seven Los Angeles-based Black photographers between 1949 and 1970 is one of 3 grants done in LA. Another is the first year of The Amateur Athletic Association grantees - young community sports teams in southern CA. Since 1992 she has been to Israel 14 times working on a book project documenting the lives of Ethiopian Jews in Israel. Her project is entitled From Tesfa to Tikva, and will be published by 2012. She continues to have exhibitions of this work around the United States.