Non-profit Organization

Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research

The Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research primarily documents and preserves the history of twentieth-century radicalism and social change through progressive movements in the greater Los Angeles area. The materials held by the library relate to the labor, peace, social justice, civil rights, women’s, gay and lesbian, and various other grassroots movements. While the library’s print holdings—numbering approximately thirty thousand books and three thousand periodical titles—range well beyond the subject of Los Angeles to socialism, Marxism, and the Cold War, its special collections focus on Los Angeles. These collections include twenty-five thousand pamphlets, fifteen hundred posters, two thousand photographs, one hundred documentary films, one hundred videos, thirty-five hundred audio tapes, organizational files for Los Angeles and national grassroots groups, and extensive subject files containing newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and reports. Among the library’s major archival collections are the papers of civil liberties defender Leo Gallagher, California Eagle editor and publisher Charlotta Bass, and Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research founders Emil and Tassia Freed, as well as papers from the Los Angeles chapter of the Civil Rights Congress, the Los Angeles Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born, the Los Angeles International Ladies Garment Workers Union, and the Los Angeles Congress of Industrial Organizations. The archival collections on the Watts Rebellion of 1965, the Los Angeles chapter of the Black Panthers, and Chicano activism are heavily used, as are the documentary films of the 1930s from the Film and Photo League and those of the 1960s from the Newsreel (SDS) collective. The library is committed to making its collections on the multicultural history of Los Angeles widely available and to working with other institutions and organizations to ensure that a broadly based historical record of the city’s people is preserved for future generations.

C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles, Max and Lore Zeller Library

The Max and Lore Zeller Library provides a specialized collection (including rare books) of over 6,500 volumes on Jungian psychology and related subjects: sandplay therapy, general psychology, anthropology, mythology, religion, alchemy, art and symbolism. The extensive book collection, 800 audio CDs, videotapes and DVDs, and 16 journals are available to the analytic community and the general public through an affordable membership fee. Library membership provides onsite access to the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS). Drawing upon C.G. Jung’s work on the archetype and the collective unconscious, ARAS is a pictorial and written archive of mythological, ritualistic, and symbolic images from all over the world and from all epochs of human history. The archive contains over 17,000 photographic images, each cross-indexed, and accompanied by scholarly commentary. The commentary includes a description of the image that serves to place it in its unique historical, cultural, and geographical setting. The ARAS commentaries honor both the universal patterns and specific cultural context associated with each image. The librarian is available to help steer readers toward their particular interests.

Mojave Desert Archives

The Mojave Desert Archives preserves the history of transcontinental travel to the Los Angeles region through the Mojave Desert of eastern California. Route 66, National Old Trails Road, the Mojave Wagon Road, the Santa Fe Railway (now BNSF), Union Pacific Railroad, and Interstate highways were and are major transit routes through the desert terminating in the Los Angeles basin. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Los Angeles area residents traveled through and returned to the Mojave Desert over these routes to deliver mail and supplies, engage in military campaigns, harvest natural resources, graze cattle, homestead, and run roadside businesses. Today, the Mojave serves as an important transit region for Angelenos seeking recreational opportunities in Las Vegas, on the Colorado River, or to simply enjoy the solitude and sublime beauty of our vast desert.

Glendora Historical Society

The collection at the museum is an eclectic assortment of items from the 1800's through the 1900's. There are tools for the home and farm, furniture, household accessories, office equipment, documents, photographs, and all types of clothing. Many items have been contributed by local residents over the years and have a direct connection to the "Upper San Gabriel Valley" and its residents.

Institute for Baseball Studies

The Institute for Baseball Studies is the first humanities-based research center of its kind associated with a college or university in the United States. The Institute is a collaborative effort of Whittier College administrators and faculty members, and the Baseball Reliquary. The Institute's research collection includes books and periodicals, the papers of distinguished baseball historians and journalists, the Baseball Reliquary's organizational history and documentation, and a variety of materials that supports multifaceted and interdisciplinary studies at Whittier College, and that prompts the exchange of ideas, the development of research initiatives, and the creation of public symposia and programs highlighting baseball's significance in American culture.

Aerospace Legacy Foundation

The Aerospace Legacy Foundation is a volunteer 501c3 organization dedicated to preserving the history of the Aerospace Industry of southern California. We maintain archives of documents, graphics, photographs, and artifacts from the industry and especially the original Downey Industrial site. Collections include; Emsco, Vultee, North American Aviation, Rockwell, Boeing, NASA, etc. A number of personal collections have been donated by individuals who worked at the Downey site.

Wende Museum

The Wende Museum collects artworks, artifacts, and personal histories that record daily life, creative expression, and political developments in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union during the Cold War period. The collection comprises a variety of media including design objects, works on paper, ceramics, paintings, sculptures, posters, furniture, textiles, photographs, films, videos, sound recordings, books, periodicals, and archives. Special projects and collections relate these artifacts to Los Angeles history and its residents, including Cold War Culver City, documenting local historical sites from the Cold War, and From Red State to Golden State: Soviet Jewish Immigration to the City of Angels, an intergenerational oral history project and documentary film. We are also the repository for the oral histories collected by the Albanian Human Rights Project, a Los-Angeles-based organization dedicated to collecting, filming, and preserving the testimonies of Albanians who were politically imprisoned or interned from 1944-1991 during Albania’s communist regime.

Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation

We are an advocacy group founded in 1987, dedicated to protecting, preserving, restoring and sustaining the Historic movie palaces and theaters of Los Angeles. We are recent recipients of an extensive collection of historical documents and photographic material relating to these theaters and their relevance to the social and cultural life of Los Angeles during the last century. We are in the very early stages of figuring out how best to use and share this resource, and hope that by getting involved with LA as Subject we can develop these plans and move forward.

Orange County Historical Society

The Orange County Historical Society (OCHS) is a non-profit group which collects, preserves and shares the history of Orange County, California for the benefit of its members and the general public.