Museum

Downey Historical Society

The Downey Historical Society is located at the Downey History Center in Apollo Park. For more than thirty years, the society's all-volunteer staff has been gathering and preserving records and artifacts from and about the southeastern part of Los Angeles County. The society's collection includes original photographs from 1870 to the present (copy negatives, duplicate prints, or 35-mm slides are available for various images of historic and current events), postcards, artifacts of Downey's past, and local realia. The books, pamphlets, and periodicals in the library focus on Downey, Los Angeles County, and California. Among the subjects addressed are Native Americans, missions, archaeology, architecture, photography, biography, ethnology, and necrology. The holdings on Governor John Gateley Downey and on the aerospace industry are particularly strong. There are also directories for Los Angeles County dating back to 1871 and, on microfilm, the federal censuses of Los Angeles County from 1850 to 1920 and Sanborn Fire Insurance maps for the Los Angeles region. In the society's archive are a broken run of Downey newspapers from 1888 to 1917 and a complete run from 1918 to 1969. Also available are Downey school account books; insurance registers; pioneer water company records; burial and cemetery records from Downey Cemetery; Los Angeles County court dockets for the townships of Los Nietos, Downey, and Norwalk from 1873 to 1957; and Los Angeles County District Attorney's registers of arrests from 1883 to 1919.

Archdiocese of Los Angeles Archival Center

The Archival Center that the Archdiocese of Los Angeles built at the San Fernando Mission and opened in 1980 is a measured response to the church's obligation to collect and preserve records associated with the human activities constituting California's Catholic heritage. The facility houses papers, documents, correspondence, and related materials generated since 1840 by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and its antecedent jurisdictions. The Center's archives include numerous photographic collections and various image holdings that number in the hundreds of thousands. The center's library presently comprises about fifteen thousand books primarily on California history, American Catholic history, bibliography, archives, and archivism. Eleven digests of the center's archival documents have been published, and more than ten thousand of the library's books are classified and described in The Literary High Spots of Mission Hills, California (1998). Various objects from the center's holdings are on exhibit in the center's Historical Museum. It is the "hope and prayer" of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles "that the books, documents, manuscripts, and historical memorabilia housed at the Archival Center will become the means for as-yet-unborn generations to stand taller upon the shoulders of their predecessors."

Historical Society of Long Beach

The Historical Society of Long Beach (HSLB) was formed in 1962 with the mission to collect, preserve, and present the city’s history. Throughout the years the HSLB has occupied many locations around the city, settling at its current location in Bixby Knolls in 2007. Operations are sustained at the HSLB by grant funding, membership dues, and community fundraising through programs and events. Collections at the HSLB include an extensive photograph collection, City Manager’s Files ranging from 1923 through 1953, maps, blueprints, city directories, and bound volumes of local newspapers including the Press-Telegram and Independent. The HSLB hosts various programs throughout the year including a recorded oral history series, an architecture and hors d’oeuvres tour, panel discussions, and a historical cemetery tour.  The storefront gallery space in Bixby Knolls is utilized to present rotating exhibitions. Past exhibits include Long Beach Remembers Pearl Harbor, Black Gold: Oil in the Neighborhood, Coming Out in Long Beach, and the current exhibit is Chrome! Cruisin’, Clubs & Drag Strips, exploring the car culture in and around Long Beach from the 1940s to the mid-1970s.

UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts at the Hammer Museum

The collection of the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts comprises more than 45,000 prints, drawings, photographs, and artists' books dating from the Renaissance to the present. Established in 1956 with a substantial gift from Fred Grunwald, the collection has been steadily enriched through significant acquisitions and donations. A primary resource for teaching and research, the Grunwald Center houses one of the most significant collections of works on paper in the country. The Grunwald Center is home to several important Los Angeles-based collections. These include the archives of Sister Corita Kent (1918–1986), the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, and Edition Jacob Samuel. Designer of the “LOVE” postage stamp first issued by the United States Postal Service in 1985, Sister Corita Kent was art director at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles until 1968. Her colorful screen prints address social and political issues through the visual language of Pop Art and experimental typography. The Grunwald Center’s collection features several thousand examples of her work, including rare preparatory studies. The Tamarind Lithography Workshop was founded in 1960 by printmaker and painter June Wayne, a leader in the movement to revive the art of lithography in Los Angeles. Through partnerships between master printers and important contemporary artists, the workshop produced an eclectic group of limited edition lithographs. The Grunwald maintains a complete record of the first 20 years of Tamarind’s activities, offering a rich cross section of contemporary printmaking in Los Angeles and internationally. Co-owned with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Jacob Samuel Archive documents the activities of master printer Jacob Samuel, who has been working out of his Ocean Park studio since 1988. Samuel, who has collaborated with artists ranging from Marina Abramovic to Christopher Wool, reinvents classic intaglio techniques to create stunning examples of contemporary printmaking. The Grunwald has been enriched by its long-standing association with the UCLA Department of Art. It houses an extensive selection of works by UCLA art department faculty from the past five decades, including Clinton Adams, William Brice, John Paul Jones, Catherine Opie, and James Welling. The Grunwald also maintains an important collection of works by Los Angeles photographers trained under Robert Heinecken, who established the Grunwald’s photography collection as a teaching resource for the photography program he built at UCLA.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Mr. & Mrs. Allan C. Balch Research Library

In the collection of the Mr. and Mrs. Allan C. Balch Art Research Library are posters and other pieces of ephemera relating to local exhibitions, artists, and organizations; all of this material is arranged in vertical files. The artist and gallery exhibition files include thousands of items of documentation on the artists living and working in Los Angeles and the galleries where they have shown their work. Included are announcements for many of the significant galleries of the early Los Angeles art scene—Ankrum, Asher/Faure, Baum/Silverman, Terry DeLapp, Dwan, Ferus, Dalzell Hatfield, Paul Kantor, Felix Landau, Frank Perls, Esther Robles, Stendahl, and David Stuart, among others.

San Pedro Bay Historical Society

The SPBHS Archives are located at 638 S. Beacon Street, 6th Fl., San Pedro, CA 90731. Note: Mail is not delievered here.

The collections of the San Pedro Bay Historical Society comprise documents, large and small photographs, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, maps, slides, books, ephemera, and regalia relating to the flora, fauna, geology, people (including Native Americans), industries, businesses, social life, and organizations of the San Pedro Bay area. These materials include in-depth information on the history and development of the Port of Los Angeles. Archival materials such as photographs, memorabilia, and documents provide insight into social, political, and cultural life in the San Pedro Bay area.

Watts Labor Community Action Committee

Collections of the Watts Labor Community Action Committee contain video interviews, documentaries, photographs, art, collectibles, and other ephemera. Subjects include deep information about So Cal oil history, rail porters, Watts area development, housing, transportation, homelessness, workforce development, activism, advocacy and policy. 100 year [paper] collection of Mirror/Times Mirror/Times daily newspaper, 100 year [paper] collection of National Geographic, original rare policy documents, historic research publications, proposals, contracts, etc. Large collection of Americana including rail transportation memorabilia and toys, racist memorabilia, photographs on South Central, Panther Party photographs (on loan from Howard Bingham), Martin Luther King photographs (licensed by Ben Fernandez), More than 2,000 hours of events, seminars, productions and other WLCAC activities in digital (transferred from Beta, VHS, Hi-8 and Mini DV). Old documents tracking the history of WLCAC and the life of its' founder, Ted Watkins, including family photographs, awards and other recognition.

Duarte Historical Museum

The collection of the Duarte Historical Society and Friends of the Library focuses on the history of the City of Duarte and adjacent Bradbury. Its archive includes photographs, records, and other artifacts related to the settlers and families who developed Duarte, the local schools, and the local citrus industry..

Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society

The Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society's collection contains photo-graphs, books, pamphlets, documents, artifacts, and oral interviews dealing with the history of the West San Fernando Valley, with emphasis on the area that was originally known as Owensmouth and is now called Canoga Park. Among these materials are high school yearbooks from 1916 to the 1950s; publications from the local women's club; a thesis on the development of the town; clippings and scrapbooks; and ephemera from the chamber of commerce, the Lion's Club, and other local organizations. Permanent and rotating displays at the society's museum depict life in the San Fernando Valley from the days of the Chumash Indians through the Mexican Rancho era and the period of dry farming and grain growing in the 1800s to the transformation brought about by the arrival of aerospace industries in the 1950s and 1960s.