Community Service Organization

Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research

The Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research primarily documents and preserves the history of twentieth-century radicalism and social change through progressive movements in the greater Los Angeles area. The materials held by the library relate to the labor, peace, social justice, civil rights, women’s, gay and lesbian, and various other grassroots movements. While the library’s print holdings—numbering approximately thirty thousand books and three thousand periodical titles—range well beyond the subject of Los Angeles to socialism, Marxism, and the Cold War, its special collections focus on Los Angeles. These collections include twenty-five thousand pamphlets, fifteen hundred posters, two thousand photographs, one hundred documentary films, one hundred videos, thirty-five hundred audio tapes, organizational files for Los Angeles and national grassroots groups, and extensive subject files containing newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and reports. Among the library’s major archival collections are the papers of civil liberties defender Leo Gallagher, California Eagle editor and publisher Charlotta Bass, and Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research founders Emil and Tassia Freed, as well as papers from the Los Angeles chapter of the Civil Rights Congress, the Los Angeles Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born, the Los Angeles International Ladies Garment Workers Union, and the Los Angeles Congress of Industrial Organizations. The archival collections on the Watts Rebellion of 1965, the Los Angeles chapter of the Black Panthers, and Chicano activism are heavily used, as are the documentary films of the 1930s from the Film and Photo League and those of the 1960s from the Newsreel (SDS) collective. The library is committed to making its collections on the multicultural history of Los Angeles widely available and to working with other institutions and organizations to ensure that a broadly based historical record of the city’s people is preserved for future generations.

C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles, Max and Lore Zeller Library

The Max and Lore Zeller Library provides a specialized collection (including rare books) of over 6,500 volumes on Jungian psychology and related subjects: sandplay therapy, general psychology, anthropology, mythology, religion, alchemy, art and symbolism. The extensive book collection, 800 audio CDs, videotapes and DVDs, and 16 journals are available to the analytic community and the general public through an affordable membership fee. Library membership provides onsite access to the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS). Drawing upon C.G. Jung’s work on the archetype and the collective unconscious, ARAS is a pictorial and written archive of mythological, ritualistic, and symbolic images from all over the world and from all epochs of human history. The archive contains over 17,000 photographic images, each cross-indexed, and accompanied by scholarly commentary. The commentary includes a description of the image that serves to place it in its unique historical, cultural, and geographical setting. The ARAS commentaries honor both the universal patterns and specific cultural context associated with each image. The librarian is available to help steer readers toward their particular interests.

Friends of Greystone

FOG's Archive mission is to collect, preserve and exhibit material that documents the history of Greystone Mansion. Materials in our collection consists of a rich and expanding historic photo archive of the property, family and The Knoll (the subsequent home of Lucy Doheny Battson). The archive collection also includes family portraits, magazine articles, maps, books, ephemera and personal family materials and objects. Greystone has been on the National register of Historic places since 1976. The land on which Greystone was built, was a gift from oil baron Edward L. Doheny Sr., the first man to discover oil in Los Angeles, to his son, Edward "Ned" Doheny. The mansion is most notable for its famous family, architect Gordon Kaufmann and its association to the USC Doheny Library as well as the Doheny Mansion at Mount St. Mary's College in Los Angeles. The Friends of Greystone is a non-profit organization founded to preserve, protect, promote and enhance the historic Greystone Mansion.

Filipino American Library (FAL)

A compilation of published and unpublished materials on the history of Filipinos in Los Angeles, including the formation of Historic Filipinotown. The collection includes books, reports, memorandums, periodicals, and programs. The history of Filipinos in Los Angeles is the most popular research topic at the Filipino American Library (FAL).

Center for Oral and Public History/California State University, Fullerton

Collections include 5,000+ oral histories in 250 projects, representing geographical, ethnic, political, religious, and social communities of selected Orange County, Los Angeles, Southern California, and Western US locales. Topics include community histories, environmental studies, including Sierra Club, Laguna Beach Greenbelt, Bolsa Chica, ethnic studies (African American, Native American, Mexican American, Japanese American, Judaica Studies, Vietnamese Americans), politics and government (Orange County politics, conservative women), society and culture (sulf culture, surf music, women with silicone breast implants, sports and society in Cold War Southern California, theater, baseball, women in long-term marriages, transformation of grocery stores, and new wave in Czechoslovakian film, 1990s UCI fertility clinic scandal, Mormon colonies in Mexico), just to name a few.

Santa Monica History Museum

The Santa Monica Historical Society was founded in 1975 as part of the city’s centennial celebration with the mission of collecting and preserving the history, art and culture of the Santa Monica Bay Area. In 1988, a Museum was established to house the Society’s growing collections of artifacts, documents, rare books, newspapers, textiles, artwork, and photographic images. Currently, the Museum’s Image Archives comprise over 500,000 photographs and negatives depicting the local history of Santa Monica, Ocean Park, Santa Monica Canyon, Pacific Palisades, Malibu, Venice and Marina del Rey. The Outlook Newspaper Collection, one of the Museum’s primary holdings, consists of newspapers in hardcopy and on microfilm, extensive files by people and subject headings, and an estimated 400,000 photographs and negatives. Operating from 1875 at the time of the city’s founding until 1998 when the publication ceased its operations, the daily newspaper covered local, regional, state and national events. With an award-winning staff of professional photographers, the newspaper produced a significant archive of images that comprehensively portray the cultural, political and social life of the Santa Monica Bay Area communities. In addition, the archive contains images of major events taking place in the greater Los Angeles area, including cultural affairs, politics, features, sports, celebrities, presidential visits and conventions, the Los Angeles riots and earthquakes, fires and floods. The Museum also houses the collections of Outlook Newspaper photographers Bill Beebe, consisting of approximately 75,000 images from the 1930s to the 1960s, and Bob Smith, consisting of approximately 6,000 images from the 1960s to the 1990s. The Museum’s Image Archives also include publisher Diane Margolin’s City Scene images, the Santa Monica Chamber of Commerce Collection and the Museum’s extensive collection of early Santa Monica photographs.

Santa Monica Cultural Affairs Division

The City of Santa Monica’s Cultural Affairs Division has a portable visual art collection produced by contemporary artists, including works by seventy-five Southern Californians. It also maintains a permanent collection of public art sculpture and urban design murals. These collections are intended to enrich the lives of the city’s residents and visitors; they also document the history of art in Santa Monica and illustrate the city’s role in the professional art world. "ArtSea," a comprehensive guide to the galleries, museums, clubs, bookstores, landmarks, and other cultural resources in the City of Santa Monica, is available from the Cultural Affairs Division.

Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Lillian Fellows Memorial Archive

Childrens Hospital Society of Los Angeles was established in 1901 by a small group of women who recognized the need for a hospital that could serve ill, crippled, and under-privileged children. The original hospital, opened in 1902, was a modest two-story, canary-yellow, clapboard house. It had nine beds, was served by one volunteer doctor and treated fourteen patients its first year. By 1905, the hospital had expanded to accommodate twenty patients, the kitchen pantry converted in to a surgery suite, and 229 children had received care. The hospital soon after received two generous donations- one of land, the other of real-property, which made possible a relocation and expansion of the hospital, and in 1913, Childrens Hospital opened a 100-bed facility in a remote, unincorporated part of the city at Sunset & Vermont Avenues. Subsequent years of tireless and ingenious fund raising efforts by all-female board of directors, managers, and auxiliaries produced steady income for the non-profit hospital. Today, CHLA is a national leader in pediatric care and research and serves over 300,000 patients annually at its four-acre facility. The Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Lillian Fellows Memorial Archive is named for the daughter of Emma Phillips, the donor who bequeathed the land upon which the current hospital is situated. Mrs. Phillips’ gift stipulated that her deceased daughter’s portrait hang for fifty years in the new hospital, and that portrait now serves as the cornerstone of the archive collection. Development of the archive began in 2000 with the collection and assessment of historical materials for research on the book, “Childrens Hospital and the Leaders of Los Angeles: The First 100 Years,” by Margaret Leslie Davis, published in conjunction with the CHLA Centennial Celebration. The archive is home to a variety of materials, including photographs, medical records, publications, scrapbooks, diaries, documents, artwork, and artifacts. Photographic images include hospital founders, patients, doctors, administrators, campus development, and regional images of general historic interest. The archive contains complete collections dating from 1901 through 1940 of annual reports, admissions logs, medical procedures summaries, and daily census reports, as well as monthly newsletters published since 1940. The records of Mrs. Gabriel Duque, long term Chair of the Associates & Affiliates and CHLA Board member, are preserved in the archive, as are generous donations of historic materials from various auxiliary groups including fund-raising records, annual Doll Fair, Fashion Show, and Debutante Ball scrapbooks, administration files, meeting minutes, 1940s Debutante Registers, publicity brochures, and a variety of World War II memorabilia. Also housed in the archive are oral histories of hospital administrators, doctors, nurses, and volunteers gathered under the auspices of the Centennial Celebration project.

Automobile Club of Southern California

The Automobile Club of Southern California was founded in 1900, and the records of its undertakings provide a distinctive picture of life in the region during the twentieth century. The documents and pictorial materials in the club’s archive relate not only to the club’s history but also to local and regional architecture, infrastructure, public policy making, and cultural and recreational history. The charting and mapping of Southern California’s roads began in 1906. The club’s archive contains original vellum renderings of strip maps and road maps, as well as printed maps made from these renderings, for the period 1906 to the present. These maps offer a continuous, definitive record of the development of roadways and roadside services in the region. Since 1909, the club has published a monthly magazine focused on automotive tourism. The archived issues of Touring Topics and its successor, Westways, provide a chronicle of landscapes and destinations which includes extensive photographic coverage of the deserts and coastal regions of California, the national parks of the American West, and Hawaii. The club began to participate in discussions about transportation policy in 1909. Its activities in this area have involved independent provision of planning studies as well as commentary on public policies and programs. In 1922 the Automobile Club produced the first traffic survey of Los Angeles, and in 1937 it wrote the first detailed proposal for a regionwide freeway system. The working files for these projects constitute a rich source of material on the region. A substantial portion of the holdings documents the workings—from the board of directors to daily operations in dozens of district offices—of the Automobile Club itself.