Church/Mosque/Synagogue/Temple

Los Angeles United Methodist Museum of Social Justice

The Museum of Social Justice is located in La Plaza United Methodist Church, on the site of the oldest section of Los Angeles. The Museum’s historical collection consists of documents, photographs, artifacts, and other materials created by La Plaza Methodist Church at the beginning of the twentieth century. The collection features over 2000 photographs that capture the work of the founders of the church, its community center, medical clinic, and the predominantly poor Mexican immigrant population the church was founded to serve. The documents provide a look into the poor living conditions that existed near the Plaza and how La Plaza Methodist Church's social justice practices improved the lives of many of the immigrants living on and near the Plaza. Among other items, the photos feature the first integrated drinking fountain in Los Angeles and the founding of Goddwill Industries of Southern California.  

Cal-Pac United Methodist Commission on Archives and History

The Archives collection of the California-Pacific Annual Conference is comprised of annual conference journals, books, records of active and discontinued local churches, administrative documents, directories, newspapers, photographic and audio-visual materials, and ephemera documenting the history of the California-Pacific Annual conference and all it antecedents. Subject areas covered by the collection include, but are not limited to conference government and infrastructure, church histories, pastors, and various conference agencies. The Archives are housed in the Claremont School of Theology Library's Special Collection area. There are also additional electronic genealogical and historical material on the California- Pacific Conference Archives and History web page

Archdiocese of Los Angeles Archival Center

The Archival Center that the Archdiocese of Los Angeles built at the San Fernando Mission and opened in 1980 is a measured response to the church's obligation to collect and preserve records associated with the human activities constituting California's Catholic heritage. The facility houses papers, documents, correspondence, and related materials generated since 1840 by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and its antecedent jurisdictions. The Center's archives include numerous photographic collections and various image holdings that number in the hundreds of thousands. The center's library presently comprises about fifteen thousand books primarily on California history, American Catholic history, bibliography, archives, and archivism. Eleven digests of the center's archival documents have been published, and more than ten thousand of the library's books are classified and described in The Literary High Spots of Mission Hills, California (1998). Various objects from the center's holdings are on exhibit in the center's Historical Museum. It is the "hope and prayer" of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles "that the books, documents, manuscripts, and historical memorabilia housed at the Archival Center will become the means for as-yet-unborn generations to stand taller upon the shoulders of their predecessors."

Immanuel Presbyterian Church

Immanuel Presbyterian Church has corporate minutes; organizational records of governing bodies, committees, and other subgroups; and membership records. In the church's library are publications dealing with the history of the church, which is over one hundred years old and was known as a leader in the neighborhood, the city, and the Presbyterian community during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. Immanuel Presbyterian Church is now focusing on being more responsive to the needs of the community and on creating bonds between the church and the surrounding area. For example, the church conducts citizenship classes and participates in various collaborative efforts with other community development organizations and the Wilshire Chamber of Commerce. The congregation presently comprises Hispanics from Central and South America and Mexico, Anglos, Filipinos, Koreans, and African Americans.